Author Topic: The decimal coinage of Fiji  (Read 471 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2018, 12:24:24 AM »




The new 50 cents coin of 2009.



From Wikipedia:

In 2009 the demonetization of the 1 and 2 cent coins was made official and a new coin set of 5, 10, 20, and 50 cent coins with reduced size was introduced. The old coins based on the Australian size standard were withdrawn from circulation. The reformed coins were introduced to save on production costs. The new 50 cent piece is also round with reeded edges rather than twelve sided.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2018, 12:26:43 AM »
Here is a photo, from 1974, of a typical Fijian outrigger boat.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2018, 04:52:18 PM »
From Wikipedia:

In 2013 Fiji released a whole family of new coins, with fauna themes, and without the Queen's portrait. This new series saw the introduction of a $2 coin, replacing the corresponding note just as the $1 coin had done before. This coin faced controversy due to being too easily mistaken as a $1, as it was only slightly larger of the same color. It was replaced by a larger and thicker Spanish flower shaped $2 coin in 2014. The metallic content of both the $1 and $2 was also changed in 2014 for better durability and resistance to wear after widespread complaints of the coins corroding and "turning black".

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2018, 04:56:25 PM »
Fiji became a republic in 1987, and it was suspended from the Commonwealth in 2009, so there had been no reason to retain the Queen’s effigy on its coins for so many years. Fiji originally announced that the set would be released in June 2012, and the coins were indeed dated 2012. However, their release was postponed until 2013. The new 10 cents coin is the only standard circulation coin to portray a bat, though Poland did issue a one-year-only 2 zloty coin depicting a bat in 2013.

The designs of Fijian cultural artefacts from the reverses of the old series were retained on the new series, but the Fijian name of the artefact was now also given as part of the legend. The tanoa, from the reverse of the now defunct one cent coin was resurrected (in slightly amended form) for the two dollar coin, a new denomination. Fiji now joined a select band of countries using a different design for each obverse and reverse of their circulation coins. The new obverse designs were the work of the Royal Canadian Mint.

See also: Circulation sets where each obverse and reverse design is different.

Offline quaziright

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2018, 05:26:58 PM »
I must say junking the queens portrait for this fauna series was indeed a no brainer - politically, practically and aesthetically

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2018, 06:08:33 PM »
They did choose some nice designs. The bat is my favourite. Also it is very unusual to find a set with a different design on each obverse and reverse.

Offline Alan71

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #21 on: November 03, 2018, 07:36:09 PM »
Interesting.  I had no idea they retained the Queen on the coinage after they became a republic, or that they did it for so long.  I’m surprised they were even allowed to do that.  Fine to keep older coins with her portrait in circulation (Hong Kong does so) but not to still issue post-1987 dated coins when she wasn’t the head of state.  If you’re going to become a republic (by coup or otherwise) surely the one of the first things to do is change the obverse of the coinage?

Offline quaziright

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2018, 07:43:13 PM »
Interesting.  I had no idea they retained the Queen on the coinage after they became a republic, or that they did it for so long.  I’m surprised they were even allowed to do that.  Fine to keep older coins with her portrait in circulation (Hong Kong does so) but not to still issue post-1987 dated coins when she wasn’t the head of state.  If you’re going to become a republic (by coup or otherwise) surely the one of the first things to do is change the obverse of the coinage?

I thought Gâmbia would have been a similar case, but apparently not. In any case, since Fiji already had the die for the queen, what could the UK have really done? Sanction them? And the mints that produce the coins?

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2018, 08:01:01 PM »
The issue of the Queen is still controversial in Fiji. Some of the old die-hards are still monarchists, and many of the chiefs still regard the Queen as the Paramount Chief. Fiji has had plenty of time to change its flag too, and get rid of the old British and imperial symbols, but apparently that is a controversial issue too. I imagine that time runs that much more slowly in Fiji anyway, so these are probably not burning issues.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #24 on: November 04, 2018, 04:49:14 AM »
Interesting.  I had no idea they retained the Queen on the coinage after they became a republic, or that they did it for so long.  I’m surprised they were even allowed to do that.  Fine to keep older coins with her portrait in circulation (Hong Kong does so) but not to still issue post-1987 dated coins when she wasn’t the head of state.  If you’re going to become a republic (by coup or otherwise) surely the one of the first things to do is change the obverse of the coinage?

Mauritius and Barbados are also the nations who took their own time to replace Queen's effigy from their coinage. Perhaps newly independent nations have more pressing problems than thinking about coins.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #25 on: November 04, 2018, 10:35:28 AM »
Mauritius and Barbados are also the nations who took their own time to replace Queen's effigy from their coinage. Perhaps newly independent nations have more pressing problems than thinking about coins.

Barbados? It never used the Queen's effigy. You must be thinking of some other country.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #26 on: November 04, 2018, 11:04:19 AM »
Barbados became independent in 1965.
Prior to that they were using coins of British Carribean Territories ( Eastern Group).
They withdrew from the group and did not join the group East Carribean States.
They continued using BCT( EG) coins with effigy of QE II.
The new coins of Barbados were issued in 1973 without the effigy.
QE II is still the Head of State.

Offline <k>

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Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Fiji
« Reply #28 on: November 04, 2018, 03:05:51 PM »


Interesting that the original lower denomination coins (1c to 20c) were dentillated around the rim of the reverse side, while the obverse side was not. The lower denomination coins of the 2012 set are dentillated on both sides.