Author Topic: Fake detector  (Read 1419 times)

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Online FosseWay

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Re: 19th Century counterfeit detection scale
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2021, 01:47:14 PM »
This thread is also relevant here, especially Malcolm's first reply (2nd post in the thread) where he shows an advertisement for Harrison scales from the 1770s. I presume this is the same company that made my sovereign balance (though my balance is considerably later - the earliest it can be is 1816).

Offline brandm24

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Re: 19th Century counterfeit detection scale
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2021, 02:16:50 PM »
I've since found that Harrison's first name was Samuel. I do recall a vague reference to a Thomas Harrison but there was no "meat" to it. I really wish I could find some solid history about Harrison and his company but I haven't had any luck. Since the surname is common and the men were in different cities there probably wasn't any relation. A check of Birmingham directories, which I don't have access to, might be helpful.

Bruce
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Offline malj1

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Re: Fake detector
« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2021, 11:25:35 PM »
In olden times, BC, you had to buy the book before the coin. Sheppard & Musham's Money Scales and Weights was the bible then.

Sadly it doesn't mention my Smith scales. It does however have Alex's Harrison scale and dates it to after 1830? see below for scan of the entry. ...there are many others.

This large collection described in the book was later acquired by the Museum of Hull. Sadly the entire collection was destroyed by enemy action in WW2.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline malj1

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Re: Fake detector
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2021, 11:33:01 PM »
I meant to mention gilding of sixpences occurred with the intention of passing as half sovereigns.

The two topics are now merged into one.
Malcolm
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Fake detector
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2021, 01:14:18 AM »
I saw an auction sight that offered a scale for sovereign and half sovereign coins c.1832. The maker was John Smith of Birmingham...probably the same scale as yours by the same manufacturer. I couldn't find any other information about Smith, unfortunately.

Bruce
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Fake detector
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2021, 12:24:09 PM »
I came across a picture of the Smith scale on the auction site. Unfortunately, it's not very good but does look like yours, Mal. Still nothing on John Smith.

Bruce
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Offline brandm24

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Re: Fake detector
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2021, 07:30:11 PM »
I finally found an 1835 Birmingham directory online and both Harrison and Smith are listed.

John Smith / Lathe and other machine manufacturer / Trinity Street.

Samuel Harrison / Die turner and tool manufacturer / 32 Fazeley Street.

Ai least now we know they were Birmingham manufacturers c.1830's. These are the two we were looking for.

Bruce
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Fake detector
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2021, 09:42:40 PM »
I am wondering how these inventions could be deposited in at least the Netherlands (1829), the UK (1830?) and the US (when?). Industrial property must have been either chaotic or stopping at the national borders.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.