Author Topic: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them  (Read 359 times)

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Offline coin_lover

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acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« on: October 13, 2018, 11:22:07 AM »
Guys I have ordered around 500 of these acid free envelopes - I was wondering if it is fine to write on them using a ball point pen - again will ink harm the coin in any way - off course I will be writing on the outer envelope.
would you recommend a ball point pen, a gel pen or pencil? ANy thoughts

Offline THCoins

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2018, 11:53:40 AM »
In my experience ballpen writing became ugly and faded in the paper after some years. Pencil marks did better, and the graphite won't do any harm.

Offline coin_lover

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2018, 12:38:10 PM »
Thanks THcoins, well pencil would generally fade rather than ink, is ink harmful to coins

Offline Figleaf

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2018, 05:16:12 PM »
TH's experience with pencil is the same as mine. It remains clear, while ink fades.

Ink is a liquid. Depending on the characteristics of the pen and the paper, it can be absorbed by the paper to such an extent that it can reach the coin. While I am not sure if and for which metals it would be harmful, as an investor, I immediately wonder why I would run the risk if I don't get paid for running the risk.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline coin_lover

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2018, 10:04:36 PM »
makes sense, thanks Peter

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2018, 06:06:34 PM »
I use pencil. If I make a mistake I can erase it and start again. If I part with the coin for any reason, I can reuse the envelope.

Offline Prosit

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2018, 06:24:52 PM »
Inks that fade quickly are dyes; often vegetable dyes. True mineral inks do much better and even after hundreds of years Chinese ink paintings (some from 12th century) still seem fresh. The finest inks were considered to be made from Tung oil soot although pine and vegetable oil soots are also used.

India Ink is also a good choice for writing.
I don't believe true mineral inks will harm a coin and will not appreciably fade anytime soon.

Dale
 

Offline FosseWay

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2018, 10:05:45 PM »
Even standard fountain pen ink won't fade much in the likely context of paper envelopes for coins (you're unlikely to be keeping them exposed to daylight, never mind direct sunlight). But (a) paper that is good for coins may not be suitable for ink - it may run and make your writing illegible or cause unsightly blots. And (b), which is the clincher for me, you can't easily erase the ink and reuse the envelope. Pencil can be rubbed out. (Ballpoint pens are the work of the devil and I avoid using them for anything. My writing is much better in pencil or ink, and I find my hand starts to cramp when writing anything longer than a shopping list with a ballpoint.)

Some 2x2 flips - the cardboard ones with a clear plastic circle in the middle - are made of something that it's very difficult to write on using *anything*. I have to resort to cutting a suitable sized piece off an address label and sticking that on, and the adhesive on those in my experience lasts considerably less long than ink.

Offline malj1

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2018, 11:00:02 PM »
Pencil on envelope from 1978

Perhaps softer than HB?
Malcolm
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2018, 08:51:51 AM »
Some 2x2 flips - the cardboard ones with a clear plastic circle in the middle - are made of something that it's very difficult to write on using *anything*. I have to resort to cutting a suitable sized piece off an address label and sticking that on, and the adhesive on those in my experience lasts considerably less long than ink.

My experience is that on coated paper, pencil will work. However, rubbing it out requires a technique. Use a clean eraser and rub from the centre to the side only. While this will remove the graphite, an imprint of what was there remains. It will be hardly visible if you write something else on the same place, though.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2018, 09:04:22 AM »
Pencil works on some, with the indentations left as you mention. But on a significant number of mine it's essentially impossible to leave a coloured mark at all - the pencil leaves an indentation if you press hard enough, but no more than that, and most pens don't work either. They either don't leave any ink, or the ink they leave refuses to dry and just smudges.

The same applies to hard plastic 2x2s - the ones with a slot into which you push the flexible cellophane. These sometimes have a small area which will take pencil markings but this is far too small. If it's possible to give them a surface that can be written on, I don't understand why the whole surface isn't given that treatment. Why restrict users to a tiny proportion of the available space? I want generally to write country, denomination, date and my type number on the packet. For tokens also the town and/or company that issued them. This is one reason why I prefer acid-free paper 2x2s to the ones where you can see the coin without taking it out of the holder.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2018, 09:22:31 AM »
It sounds like a spot where the coating either didn't hold or was never applied, e.g. because the carton was held there during the coating process. The most obvious solution would be to change brand or supplier. Alternatively, you can experiment to see if you can solve the coating locally. Some vinegar might do the trick, or it could give you an ugly spot. Pre-rubbing with an eraser might also help.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: acid free envelopes - is it fine to write on them
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2018, 10:08:59 AM »
I tend to use paper holders. I reuse other forms of 2x2 holder when I am happy with their quality from a conservation perspective, and it's these that are sometimes hard to write on.