Comments on Official Currencies of the Islands of the Caribbean Plus

Started by Galapagos, October 05, 2009, 04:09:47 PM

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<k>

Quote from: Figleaf on February 21, 2014, 06:06:19 PM
Willemstad.

Peter

Willemstad - that city being the capital of Curaçao.  So what about poor old Sint Maarten, then? I thought that bank was supposed to be their joint bank, handling their new joint currency, the Caribbean guilder (which is behind schedule anyway).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Its probably because of some Dutch delegate. In the Gouda-cheese-driven mind, Curaçao and Willemstad are more or less one name, because there is a Willemstad in the Netherlands. Something like Frankfurt-an-der-Oder. No German who doesn't live there will call it Frankfurt.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Quote from: <k> on February 21, 2014, 06:49:12 PM
So what about poor old Sint Maarten, then?

Guess they want to focus on one TLD, and picked Curaçao's. But the domain works with Sint Maarten's TLD too: http://www.centralbank.sx

Christian

<k>

TLD = Top Level Domain.  All these abbreviations - will real words die out soon?  ;D
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild


eurocoin

The Caribbean dollar will be issued around the end of May to early June this year. Due to many reasons the issuance has been delayed. The last of them was a shortage of blanks for these new coins at the end of last year. The coins will bear the name "De Nederlandse Antillen" (The Netherlands Antilles). There has been an investigation to find out if this name legally could be used as The Netherlands Antilles doesn't exist anymore since the end of 2010.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

eurocoin

Quote from: <k> on May 09, 2014, 06:34:29 PM
Do you have a source or a link for that news, eurocoin?

The dutch numismatic magazine Muntkoerier, they quote the dutch news agency Novum.

<k>

Thanks, eurocoin.  So the name The Netherlands Antilles remains - no longer political, I suppose - more geographical. But though separate and independent, they are still part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, just as the UK shares her Queen with other countries.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

eurocoin

Quote from: <k> on May 09, 2014, 07:00:26 PM
Thanks, eurocoin.  So the name The Netherlands Antilles remains - no longer political, I suppose - more geographical. But though separate and independent, they are still part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, just as the UK shares her Queen with other countries.

Yes indeed St Maarten and Curaçao stay independent from each other and both countries stay independent countries within Kingdom The Netherlands. This is indeed just a geographical name  that is based on just a little bit more than nothing.

<k>

It's rather strange that, while we wait for the Caribbean guilder, coins are still being issued in the name of a country that no longer exists: the Netherlands Antilles.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Pabitra

My Dutch friends have not been able to confirm the authenticity of these coins although Jo reported it on World coin News.

Figleaf

Looks fishy. They have the marks of the Utrecht mint, but are not mentioned on the mint's web site, while in the past, the mint was eagerly flogging this sort of stuff.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

The central bank of that non-existing country, however, does list them. ;)
http://www.centralbank.cw/index.php?eid=781

The 1G and 5G coins show Willem Alexander while the 2½ gulden piece still has Beatrix. Could be a mere error on that page though. But they look pretty darn authentic to me ...

Christian

eurocoin

The coins of 50 cent and 2 1/2 guilder haven't been minted yet (as they only appear in sets). The images below were published over a month ago on the blog of the expert Erik J. van Loon.