Author Topic: Sextus Pompey (67 BC–35 BC), AE AS, Sicilian Mint, 43–36 BC, Sear 1394, RPC 671  (Read 241 times)

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Offline Overlord

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Roman Republic: Sextus Pompey (67 BC–35 BC), AE AS, Sicilian Mint, 43–36 BC, Sear 1394, RPC 671, Syd 1044a, Cr479/1, Pompeia 20v, Cohen 16 (21.81 g, 31 mm)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sextus_Pompey

Obverse: MGN above laureate janiform head with features of Pompey the Great
Reverse: PIVS above, IMP below, prow of galley right

Offline Figleaf

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Excellent coin. The struggle between the Pompeii and Caesar/Octavianus is a great, multi-generational drama, with plenty of violence - though I presume that if a Pompeius had won, they would have been just as brutal to Caesar and his followers. Note the IMP on the coin. Pompeius was claiming a throne as much as Caesar. Rome was already sinking into military dictatorship.

I hadn't seen this type before. I really like the janiform heads. While they refer back to the earliest asses of the Roman republic, that traditionally show Janus, they are ahead of their time in that they show the emperor (in this case the pretender) as a god.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.