Author Topic: Pre-euro to euro design continuity  (Read 7286 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #90 on: September 11, 2018, 12:25:37 PM »
I am impressed that Christian has at last learned the difference between Slovakia and Slovenia these days. In the past, he sometimes got confused. I well remember the time he wanted to visit Macedonia but flew to Amazonia by mistake. He spent seven years trying to find his way out of the Amazon jungle, while being pursued by headhunters and desperately seeking a police station. Sadly, there is not a single police station in the whole of the Amazon jungle. What are you supposed to do if you get murdered? Brazil deserves to be expelled from the United Nations for that.  >:(

But I digress. Slovenia next.  :)
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #91 on: September 11, 2018, 01:09:43 PM »
Leaving the Amazon jungle was actually easier than I thought. I just had to find the Checkout button and select a payment option, and got out. ;D

Slovakia and Slovenia are more confusing: The Slovak word for the Slovak language is slovenčina, the Slovene word for the, umm, Slovenian language is slovenščina. And the word "Slovensko" on Slovak coins does of course not refer to Slovenia. Sure, in both cases the terms are references to Slavic and the Slavs - still difficult at times. Both countries have a trimount in the coat of arms (Slovakia - Slovenia), and both use the Pan-Slavic flag colors. Cointinuity will have to wait a litte ...

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #92 on: September 11, 2018, 03:22:35 PM »
The euro coins from Slovenia look quite different from their tolar predecessors. The latter all had animals; I particularly like the unpretentious little owl on the 20 stotinov coin. :)

The stork from the 20 tolarjev coin is the only design that got transferred to a euro coin; you can now see it on the 1 cent piece. Also, the 10 tolarjev coin had a horse, and the 20 cent coin has two (Lipica) horses - not sure whether that is "continuity" or not. If we include banknotes, we get a little more: Primož Trubar (€1) was on the 10 tolarjev note, France Prešeren (€2) on the 1000 tolarjev. We could take this further and add Jože Plečnik: He was on the 500 tolarjev note, but not his parliament tower project that is now on the 10 cent coin.

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #93 on: September 11, 2018, 03:51:06 PM »


Slovenia: euro coins.



Interesting that little Slovenia was the first republic to break away from Yugoslavia, closely followed by Croatia. Both are now in the EU, alone among the 7 former Yugoslav states, but only Slovenia uses the euro.

Slovenia's pre-euro designs had a style all of their own. As you mention, there is some thematic continuity in their euro designs.





1 euro cent.





20 tolar.





20 cent.





10 tolar.

 
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 12:48:48 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #94 on: September 11, 2018, 03:53:35 PM »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #95 on: September 11, 2018, 04:10:58 PM »
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 12:39:55 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #96 on: September 11, 2018, 04:11:25 PM »
.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 12:37:46 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #97 on: September 11, 2018, 04:14:44 PM »
We could take this further and add Jože Plečnik: He was on the 500 tolarjev note, but not his parliament tower project that is now on the 10 cent coin.

Very good. But you forgot to mention the names of the stork and horses that modelled for the euro coins, how much they were paid and whether are they still alive.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #98 on: September 11, 2018, 04:23:41 PM »
Counting down - not long till the conclusion now. Spain next!
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #99 on: September 11, 2018, 07:13:53 PM »
It is bad enough that I remember the names of the 1974 World Cup mascots. ;)

The Spanish euro coins have only two denominations - the highest ones - that feature a portrait of the king. (I know a few other monarchies do that too; still interesting.) But in a way this mix is a continuation of what was done before: Almost every denomination came in "regular" versions and as circulating commems, and usually the latter did not have a royal portrait.

Cervantes (10-20-50 ct) and the cathedral towers of Santiago de Compostela (1-2-5 ct) were not on peseta circulation coins. But the pilgrimage and the Camino de Santiago were on circulating 5 and 100 pesetas commemorative coins in 1993. Spanish circulating commems also honored various artists, writers, etc. - but having one on a "plain" circulation coin is new.

Plain in two regards, in my opinion: as opposed to a commem but also, well, I find the design rather plain. One other continuity aspect should not be forgotten though - we call the shape of the 20 cent coin "Spanish flower" because we adopted it. The Spanish 50 pesetas coins had that shape from 1990 until 2000. :)

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #100 on: September 11, 2018, 08:31:09 PM »
Very good. But you forgot to mention the names of the stork and horses that modelled for the euro coins, how much they were paid and whether are they still alive.

It is bad enough that I remember the names of the 1974 World Cup mascots. ;)

It's off-topic, but see this post and the three that follow it, to find out what Christian is talking about:

Tip and Tap.



See also: Animals: known individuals and models.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #101 on: September 11, 2018, 09:24:44 PM »


Spain - first euro set.



The new king's portrait still occupies the 1 and 2 euro coins. Nothing much to enjoy here, I find. I enjoy Cervantes' picaresque tales, but on this design (see below), he looks morose, even though his collar makes him appear dressed as a clown. The Spanish flower is a nice gift  to the euro system, though. It helps differentiate the coins, especially for those with handicaps.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #102 on: September 11, 2018, 09:33:18 PM »
Repent, all ye sinners, for the end is near! The end of this topic, that is.  :D 

And speaking of sinners, it's the turn of the Vatican City.  :-X
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #103 on: September 11, 2018, 11:27:01 PM »
Slovenia, 1 euro.



One last observation about the Slovenian designs. Primož Trubar reminds me of English actor Brian Blessed.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 12:38:43 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #104 on: September 12, 2018, 06:33:19 PM »
Now we come to the final journey. It's the turn of the Vatican. Below you see their standard euro designs over the years.





Pope John Paul II - 2002 to 2005.






Sede vacante, 2005, after the death of Pope John Paul II.






Pope Benedict, 2006 to 2013.






Vatican City, Pope Francis, 2014 to 2016.






Since 2017, the national side of the Vatican City's features the Pope's personal arms.




So there I have set the scene. Any thoughts?
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