Author Topic: Pre-euro to euro design continuity  (Read 7285 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #75 on: September 09, 2018, 08:56:53 AM »
Cork oaks are a sensitive subject in Portugal, making them less suitable for a national symbol. The wine industry is switching to artificial cork (rightly so). Owners want to cut cork plantations, greens want to keep them, the government wants both. ;)

Peter
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #76 on: September 09, 2018, 12:51:23 PM »
You have a point there. Don't think that anybody would want to see the cork oak go. But maybe it would be too controversial for a circulation coin now. As for the pre-euro designs, I just had a look at the escudo circulation coins, and what (or whom) they featured.

1 - cord and knot
5 - window rose
10 - some kind of jewelry
20 - compass
50 - ship (carrack)
100 - Pedro Nunes
200 - Garcia de Orta

So there is definitely no circulation coin design continuity ...

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #77 on: September 09, 2018, 01:31:49 PM »


Portugal, 5 escudos, 1966.



I did (eventually) grow to like the Portuguese circulation ship designs. Sad that Portugal did not include one in its euro set. Anyway, Portugal is a long-standing ally of Britain, so I'll write to the Daily Mail, tell them it's a disgrace, and then maybe the Mail will start a crusade about it.  8)

Below, 50 escudos, 1987.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #78 on: September 10, 2018, 01:34:38 PM »


San Marino, first set.





San Marino, second set.



Now we come to San Marino. That greedy little micro-state is onto its second euro set already. Both its euro sets are Type 4 sets, according to my classification: each coin has a different design on the national side.

So, Christian, have you ever visited San Marino? Or was it closed when you turned up?  :D

And how much do you know of their pre-euro designs, which presumably were collector pieces only? Is there any continuity between them and the euro designs?
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #79 on: September 10, 2018, 02:10:40 PM »
San Marino spewed type 4 sets before eurolisation also. They put their coat of arms on their Before Euro coins.

Peter
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #80 on: September 10, 2018, 02:43:51 PM »
San Marino spewed type 4 sets before eurolisation also. They put their coat of arms on their Before Euro coins.

Peter

Yes, the coat of arms now appears on the 1 cent coin, whereas it occupied the 1 euro coin on the previous set.

"eurolisation" - wow, such levity is regarded as treason in the euro zone, where you happen to live. If you are caught, you will be sentenced to eat British bangers for the rest of your natural life - a fate worse than death for those used to fine Continental cuisine.  :-X
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #81 on: September 10, 2018, 02:51:06 PM »
Of course I have been to San Marino. Admittedly on day trips only; one time we stayed in Ravenna (gorgeous churches in and around that city by the way), one time on the coast, and ... errm, anyway. :)  By and large I like the two sets. Would not say that one is better than the other.

San Marino has issued newly designed coin sets in pretty much every year since the renewal of the monetary agreement with Italy in 1972. (They had a "break" from 1939 until 1971.) So having to wait 15 years - from 2002 to 2017 - until the designs could be modified, that must have been tough for them.

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #82 on: September 10, 2018, 02:58:26 PM »
Of course I have been to San Marino.

But of course - Transnistria, Planet Susan of Alpha Centauri - you name it, Christian has been there.  :P

Here are some nice designs from San Marino to look at.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #83 on: September 10, 2018, 03:00:54 PM »
The UK has the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. You could say that Italy likewise "has" the Vatican and San Marino. Yes, I know, but I can't really regard them as true states.  :D
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #84 on: September 10, 2018, 06:57:16 PM »
And yet each of them has a long tradition - San Marino being the world's oldest republic, and pretty much everybody including Napoleon and Mussolini has respected its independent status. The Vatican, oh well ... basically the successor to the Papal State, by the grace of Fascist Italy's agreement, and those Lateran Treaties still apply today.

There are also Monaco (a business model rather than a country, but it works), Andorra (somewhat bigger, bordering two countries), and Liechtenstein (non-euro). They all chose to be or stay independent, with special relationships to their neighbors of course.

(Have not been to Transcentauri yet, but when you're in Ravenna, and another country to get a Been There checkmark is just around the corner ...)

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #85 on: September 10, 2018, 07:21:26 PM »
And yet each of them has a long tradition - San Marino being the world's oldest republic, and pretty much everybody including Napoleon and Mussolini has respected its independent status.

Yes, too small and unimportant to bother about, and I expect the poor little country cries itself to sleep every night.  :(

Quote
The Vatican, oh well ... basically the successor to the Papal State, by the grace of Fascist Italy's agreement, and those Lateran Treaties still apply today.

Yes, the poor Pope hankered after a bit of real estate after losing his former home. Very spiritual. (Not!). And by agreement with Fascists - that speaks volumes, does it not?  ::)

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There are also Monaco (a business model rather than a country, but it works)

 ;D ;D ;D
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #86 on: September 10, 2018, 07:22:46 PM »
Coming next: Slovakia.

Would you like to start, Christian?
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #87 on: September 11, 2018, 12:14:48 AM »
Two of the three euro and cent designs have been on Slovak coins before: Mount Kriváň (now 1, 2 and 5 cent) was on the reverse of the 20 halierov coin, and the country's coat of arms (now prominently featured on the €1 and €2 coins) was on the obverse of all circulation coins. Bratislava Castle (10, 20, 50 ct) appeared on the 500 korún banknote.

In Slovakia they had a design vote too. Nine of the ten designs that people could pick from had been on the koruna circulation coins or notes. :)  What I find a little disappointing: The koruna coin "set" had seven denominations, with seven different designs. But the national central bank (NBS) decided that, for the euro, three would be best ...

(Edit) The NBS has some detailed info in English about the euro design selection process:
Finding the euro designs
The public vote
The ten finalists people could choose from

Christian
« Last Edit: September 11, 2018, 08:48:33 AM by chrisild »

Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #88 on: September 11, 2018, 11:28:30 AM »


Slovakia, 20 halierov - an aluminium coin.  Mount  Kriváň.





The coat of arms: the common obverse on the Slovakian pre-euro coins.



The Slovaks did go through exhaustive processes to make a choice, and the results were mostly very satisfactory, IMO, though I do not like the rendition of the cross. And yes, I too would have preferred a separate design for each coin on the national side.



Below: the 500 koruna banknote.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Pre-euro to euro design continuity
« Reply #89 on: September 11, 2018, 12:16:52 PM »


Slovakia: euro coins.



Here is a reminder of the euro set.
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