Author Topic: Kindlyidentify  (Read 332 times)

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Offline Pabitra

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Kindlyidentify
« on: August 26, 2018, 12:43:29 PM »
China?

Offline MORGENSTERNN

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Re: Kindlyidentify
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2018, 01:11:13 PM »
Hello

Indeed China
AD 1911 10 CASH Y# 27
"Bronze Ruler: Hsüan-t'ung Obv: Dragon Obv. Insc.: Tai-ch'ing
T'ung-pi Rev. Leg.: Hsüan-t'ung..."
Quote from Krause



Offline Figleaf

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Re: Kindlyidentify
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2018, 03:48:55 PM »
Please check edge (the third dimension) for irregularities and provide weight and diameter.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Kindlyidentify
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2018, 06:26:46 AM »
Thanks, MORGENSTERNN

Edge is plain with no irregularities
Diameter is 29 mm
Weight

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Kindlyidentify
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2018, 08:16:18 AM »
Diameter is on the high side but acceptable. Weight should have been somewhere between 7.2 and 7.5 grams. With a weight of 8.2, this is likely to be a fake.

Compare this coin for metal colour. If yours is a copper coin that was silvered, that may explain the weight.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline MORGENSTERNN

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Re: Kindlyidentify
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2018, 10:49:51 AM »
Diameter is on the high side but acceptable. Weight should have been somewhere between 7.2 and 7.5 grams. With a weight of 8.2, this is likely to be a fake.

Compare this coin for metal colour. If yours is a copper coin that was silvered, that may explain the weight.

Peter

Hello,
The design seems very identical to the coin linked (Numista)
I have already noticed huge variations in weight for chinese coins including silver ones
Do you think that such a common coin has been faked so close to real design ???
Very expensive chinese coins are found with huge variations in design compared to the authentic examples so I do think this one is a real one (maybe a later strike with old dies).

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Kindlyidentify
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2018, 03:00:52 PM »
I understand underweight genuine coins. I do not understand overweight genuine coins, since the extra metal cost extra money to somebody, who would make sure that it wouldn't happen. Perhaps the extra weight can be explained by silvering (if indeed the coin is silvered), but 1 gram of silver seems a lot to me, especially since it looks like the copper is already coming through.

The coin being common is no obstacle. Even the most (much more) common cash coins are imitated in China. Since labour is very cheap, it turns raw copper - until recently worth very little - into a collector's item worth a lot more than its weight in copper. An advantage of imitating cheap coins is that they are likely to be less scrutinised and bought by people with less expertise, so a single die (the most expensive ingredient of making fakes) can be used more often.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.