Author Topic: Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis  (Read 550 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis
« on: August 02, 2018, 12:50:28 AM »
I wonder what you think of this. Recently I bought a (in my eyes) very beautiful Celtic tetradrachm in VF but excellent condition. Not a very high price either. A very human portrait with an expressive toothless smile (many elderly rulers must have sneered and snarled toothlessly) and telling eyes. That's a good catch! I thought.

After it arrived, it took me not too long to discover it is a fourrée. The edges are giving that away quite clearly, but now you know you will see it immediately in my pics. The coin with its beautiful high relief is maybe a bit low in weight, but for a barbarous imitation quite acceptable.

I'm in two minds about this. A very attractive contemporary Celtic imitation, but a fourrée. Is that as should be?
The seller should have mentioned it. I probably would have chosen another coin. But still, a prize, I think.

Eastern Celts, Lower Danube. Uncertain tribe. Early 3rd century BC. Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis. Obv. Laureate head of Zeus t.r., behind it, a leaf. Rev. Jockey and horse riding t.r. Under it, labda over a bucranium. Under the prancing leg of the horse, an A. 24.5 mm, 13.85 gr. Not in Flesche (? or 640?).

 

Offline THCoins

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Re: Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2018, 07:52:42 PM »
A very nicely executed design and strike for a Celtic imitation. I do feel concerned also about the fourree nature. This was not just an alternative silver monetary piece, but meant to deceive. ..On the other hand, a contemporary imitation of an imitation also makes it something special.

Offline richtea

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Re: Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2018, 12:21:13 AM »
I'm confused. You know its a modern fake, or am I misunderstanding?

If so, then it's skillfully done, but disappointing that it wasn't in Celtic hands a couple of thousand years ago.
If it was a contemporary forgery made in Celtic times that would be more interesting - well, to me.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2018, 12:45:44 AM »
I think it is an ancient coin, a fourrée, not a modern imitation. It's a very beautiful coin - but a fourrée.
-- Paul

Offline Arminius

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Re: Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2018, 08:15:43 AM »
Expressive style and portrait !
The horse is not just a horse. It looks like some mythological being.

 :applause:

Offline richtea

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Re: Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2018, 07:54:43 PM »
I think it is an ancient coin, a fourrée, not a modern imitation. It's a very beautiful coin - but a fourrée.
-- Paul

Ah, I didn't realise that fourrée meant that. I was under the impression fourrée just meant plated, not plated AND ancient. Apologies.
In that case, it's fabulous, and definitely a keeper!

The ones I'm used to seeing have been in damp UK soil, and the base metal has oxidised - causing the plate to flake off.
Example from Museum of Wales:
https://museum.wales/media/40632/forged-charles-1-crown.jpg
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 08:16:06 PM by richtea »

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Early imitation of a Philip II tetradrachm of Amphipolis
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2018, 10:57:13 PM »
Quite! (Quelle horreur, your picture!) See here.
A contemporary counterfeit, that's what I believe this to be. Don't know where to find this in the books about Celtic imitations of Macedon coins. It would help if I knew if there are more such known.
Here are some pictures of the problem.
-- Paul