Author Topic: Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881  (Read 5454 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Overlord

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 826
  • Tamdiu discendum est, quamdiu vivas
    • Collect Old Coins
Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881
« on: October 02, 2009, 09:24:06 AM »
D.Luiz Filippe succeeded his brother to the throne of Portugal on November 11, 1861. He reigned until October 19, 1889.

The currency of Portuguese India was changed to a new standard as a result of the Luso-Britannic Convention of 1880 with the silver rupee (Uma Rupia), eleven-twelfths pure silver .916 fine and weighing 11.66 grams. Half-rupee (Meia Rupia), quarter-rupee (Quarto De Rupia), and eighth-rupee (Oitavo De Rupia) as divisions were minted at both the Calcutta and Bombay mints to the same standards corresponding to the coinage of British India. The rupee and half-rupee were struck dated 1881 and 1882, while the quarter-rupee and one-eighth-rupee were issued only in 1881. A copper coinage was issued dated 1881,1884,1886 and 1888 with a much higher mintage.


Obverse Bare head of Luiz I left, LUDOVICUS I PORTUG ET ALGARB REX 1881 (Luiz I, King of Portugal and the Algarve, 1881)


Reverse Crowned plain shield, having on it seven castle towers, surrounding a cross made of five shields, all within wreath of laurel and oak; INDIA PORTUGUEZA OITAVO DE RUPIA (Portuguese India, 1/8 Rupee)

translateltd

  • Guest
Re: Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2009, 10:49:33 AM »
Here's another question that has had me wondering for quite some years now: why does the Algarve warrant a special mention in the Portuguese royal titles?  Was it ever *not* part of Portugal?

I seem to remember some similar odd reference in the royal titles on 19th century coins of either Norway or Sweden, though the exact detail escapes me at the moment.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 502
Re: Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2009, 01:51:36 PM »
Correct. For five centuries, the area was a moslim administrative area, one of five that comprised the kingdom of al-Andalus. It was known as al-Gharb al-Andalus (West Andalus). Religious intolerance led to a long series of conflicts with the locals (El Cid) and the Franks in the North (Roland's song), generally won by the Berber dynasties, who reduced the Spanish influence to a narrow strip of land south of the Pyrenees, getting a bit broader in the West.



The fall of Toledo in 1085 was a turning point in favor of the Christian kingdoms and the fall of Córdoba (the mosque of Córdoba may be Europe's most beautiful monument) split Andalus in the kingdom of Granada and West Andalus. After the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, these imploded into districts that could be captured one by one. In 1249, the Algarve fell to the kings of Portugal, who proudly took the title of king of the Algarve. In 1492, as revenge for the fall of Constantinople, Granada fell to Spain. The Spanish kings just as proudly included the pomegranate of Granada in their coat of arms.

The Algarve is one of the most fertile and pleasant areas of Portugal and still a favoured tourist destination.

Centuries of enmity between Islam and Christianity made the rulers of Spain and Portugal pretty extremist in religious matters. This hit not only moslems, but also Jews, who were driven out of the Iberian peninsula. Al-Andalus had been a centre of learning, far ahead of Northern European kingdoms. The fugitive jews took their knowledge and advocacy of tolerance and learning to the North and contributed greatly to its development.

Peter
« Last Edit: December 26, 2015, 08:29:04 PM by Niels »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6 532
  • Ahmedabad, India
Re: Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2009, 02:08:57 PM »
Peter,
An excellent lesson in European history.

I would prefer not to coment on the religious aspects of the conflict sitting in a place where even now it causes unwarranted conflicts.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 502
Re: Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2009, 02:18:08 PM »
The extremist religious attitude of the Portuguese kings spilled over to Goa, which was captured in 1510. All changed during the reign of the Marquis de Pombal, though. Pombal effectively set aside the Portuguese king and modernized the country rapidly and ruthlessly on the British model. Portugal and Britain were closely allied (the popularity of port in Britain dates from this era). Consequently, when Portugal was invaded by the army of Napoléon, British troops under Wellington landed and the allies slowly drove the French back, taking Spain in the process, to the joy of the Spanish guerrillas, who had never ceased to harass the French.

This state of great friendship made it possible for Portugal to hold on to Goa, while the British took control over the rest of the Indian peninsula. The alliance between Portugal and Britain came to an end by the affair of the pink map, which was taken very emotionally in Portugal as a disgusting British treason of a venerable alliance. The affair was instrumental in making Portugal a republic.

Peter
« Last Edit: October 02, 2009, 02:30:04 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Rangnath

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 714
Re: Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2009, 10:47:22 PM »
Thanks for the question translateltd. And thanks for the history lesson Peter.  8)
 I had never heard of the Pink Map (YIKES!) nor about how the Portuguese held on to Goa.
richie

Offline @josephjk

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 453
Re: Portuguese India: Oitavo (1/8) Rupia, 1881
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2015, 07:23:15 PM »
1.45 grams, 10.5 mm