Author Topic: An alphabet of oddities  (Read 1202 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #135 on: July 09, 2018, 05:23:05 PM »
So now we come to "W" - in the English language, that is. This coin of the West African States does look odd to my eyes, but then the culture is not mine. Which African expert can explain it to me?

Offline Bimat

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An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #136 on: July 09, 2018, 05:35:09 PM »
India next, but I wouldn't know where to start.

What does that mean? Are you saying that India did not issue a single 'odd' coin, or are all the coins issued by India are 'odd'? ;D

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #137 on: July 09, 2018, 05:39:19 PM »
Neither. I am just pointing to my lack of knowledge about the subject and thereby inviting a knowledgeable person to contribute.

Offline chrisild

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #138 on: July 09, 2018, 07:22:38 PM »
So now we come to "W" - in the English language, that is. This coin of the West African States does look odd to my eyes, but then the culture is not mine. Which African expert can explain it to me?

Those are old gold weights, I think. The single one is a stylized sawfish, which can be found on many West African States coins. It is even the main feature of the central bank's logo (BCEAO). The six identical ones are supposed to be birds, again stylized.

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #139 on: July 09, 2018, 07:34:05 PM »
Thank you, Christian.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #140 on: July 09, 2018, 08:38:52 PM »
What does that mean? Are you saying that India did not issue a single 'odd' coin, or are all the coins issued by India are 'odd'? ;D

When I asked my European friends about the oddest coin issued by Republic of India, they chose this one.

The Austrians call it " Single finger Salute coin" whereas the Belgians call it " Up yours coin".
In North India it is called "Thums up coin" whereas in South India, it is the way they show "one". The North Indians use forefinger to show "one".
So much for Cultural unity. However, according to designer Anil Sinha, former professor of NID, it symbolised unity of the world along with "fist" on 50 paisa coin but is reminiscent of famous folk tale in India. His inspiration was from Dance moves from Bharat Natyam, one of the four classical dance forms of India.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #141 on: July 09, 2018, 08:43:37 PM »
Those are old gold weights, I think. The single one is a stylized sawfish, which can be found on many West African States coins. It is even the main feature of the central bank's logo (BCEAO). The six identical ones are supposed to be birds, again stylized.
The coin was issued on 20th Anniversary of West African States monetary union and the reverse shows stylised representation of six birds pecking together, a toy for kids, representing that six members will achieve cohesion and solidarity on unification ( as legends indicates). The success of this Union is now indicated by the fact that now it has eight members.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #142 on: July 09, 2018, 08:53:57 PM »
Thanks, I'm sure you can do a link to the images too.  ;)

Bangladesh clouds variation

Offline Pabitra

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #143 on: July 09, 2018, 09:00:57 PM »
Bangladesh 5 Taka KM#26.2 & 26.3 - thickness of clouds
Pakistan 2 Rupees KM#63 & 64 - cloud missing and present

Pakistan added clouds as an afterthought, having issued the clear sky coin first.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #144 on: July 09, 2018, 10:35:54 PM »
Here is my favourite French oddity. The Louis d'or 1786 BB (Strasbourg) is known as Louis with the horns, showing the king as cuckolded. See here.

Peter

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #145 on: July 09, 2018, 10:45:29 PM »
Interesting. "Cuck", from "cuckold", is an insult currently favoured by some of the "alt_right" in the USA.

Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #146 on: July 10, 2018, 12:13:28 AM »


Belgian Congo, 2 francs, 1943.



Here the word “BELGISCH” was unfortunately misspelt as “BELGISH” - presumably because it was minted by English-speaking Americans.

This coin was issued only in 1943 and the error was never corrected.

This post is also to show that there is no need to keep everything in strict alphabetic order. Add any oddity that interests you, at any point.  ;)

Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #147 on: July 10, 2018, 12:14:45 AM »
In the English language, there is no country starting with "X". Were there any historical ones (real and not mythical).

Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #148 on: July 10, 2018, 12:27:08 AM »


Yugoslavia, 1963.  20 and 50 dinars.



Ah, yes, the swinging Sixties, when harmonious communist states such as Yugoslavia were still around. Now there are seven states where once there was one - a bonanza for coin collectors.

Offline <k>

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Re: An alphabet of oddities
« Reply #149 on: July 10, 2018, 12:36:51 AM »


10 zaires from the Bank of Zaire.





A defunct country, ruled by a brutal dictator, now dead, and a defunct currency.

See: Zaire, and the many faces of Mobutu.