Author Topic: American Innovation $1 Coins  (Read 479 times)

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Offline redlock

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American Innovation $1 Coins
« on: June 24, 2018, 07:44:10 PM »
I am a bit surprised that this hasn't been reported here yet.

After the US House of Representatives the US Senate has approved this bill
https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1326?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22s.1326%22%5D%7D&r=1
just recently.

Thus, a new series of $1 coins will be minted over a period of approx. 13 years.
As $1 coins don't really circulate in the USA these coins are basically NCLT.


Offline chrisild

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Re: American Innovation $1 Coins
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2018, 09:51:28 PM »
Yesterday the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) unanimously rejected all submitted reverse designs for the "introductory" coin. :) See the comments and designs here for example: http://mintnewsblog.com/the-ccac-unanimously-rejects-the-reverse-designs-submitted-for-the-2018-american-innovation-1-coin/

Yes, I find the designs to be fairly dull too. Then again, the artists had to follow design guidelines which required the country name, Washington's signature and the motto ...

Christian

Offline eurocoin

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Re: American Innovation $1 Coins
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2018, 10:07:30 PM »
Very interesting and daring. I can not imagine something similar happening in the Dutch Mint Advisory Committee. For me personally also interesting to see what my acquiantances Donald Everhart (artist) and Heidi Wastweet (CCAC Member) are currently working on.

Offline redlock

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Re: American Innovation $1 Coins
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2018, 10:49:41 AM »
Well, the final say has the Secretary of the Treasury. Let's see what he decides.
As the program is the law they need to make the coins. They might have some wiggle room with the introduction coin. But the program most likely cannot be stopped.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: American Innovation $1 Coins
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2018, 11:38:34 AM »
Looking at the public reaction in the link above, it looks like the programme has become a political issue. While this is understandable as it fits the Trump's America first approach, innovation can equally well be celebrated neutrally and it is in the interest of everybody, whatever their political affiliation. In that framework, a first patent can be seen as a positive (hey, I discovered something) as well as a negative (nobody can use this unless they pay me). There is no reason to say a priori that the choice of the theme of the first coin is negative. Let's wait for more coins.

That said, I get the itchy feeling that politics have already crept into the rejection of all the designs. I am somewhat comforted that it is a unanimous rejection, but only somewhat. Sure, the designs look utterly boring to me too, but in my eyes practically all modern US coin designs do. I think that more or less reflects the taste of the US public. Reflecting that taste is important to have the coins accepted in circulation and it's not up to me to deplore that, let alone change it.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Finn235

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Re: American Innovation $1 Coins
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2018, 03:35:58 PM »
Bah humbug.

We went from three decades of stagnant designs (bicentennial quarters notwithstanding) to an explosion of circulating commemoratives. The statehood quarters were fun if not uninspired, and the America the Beautiful series is redundant, but at least interesting. The important thing is, people actually use them.

The Anthony, Sacagawea, and Presidential dollar coin series were all horrendous failures. I have never been given one in change, and back when I used to use them, about 1 in 10 cashiers would try to refuse them because they were totally unaware that dollar coins exist.

Americans for whatever reason have this cultural mindset that coins are to be put in a change jar to accumulate into a small emergency/vacation fund. We don't carry coins in our pockets for some reason. I don't know if having $1 or even $2 or $5 coins would change that.

First thing's first, it's time to tell the vending machine lobby to put on their big girl panties and adapt to change. No more manganese brass that tarnishes after a month of use.  No more coins that can easily be mistaken for a quarter. Make a nice hefty, maybe bimetallic coin that feels like a dollar, and maybe people will use them.

Offline quaziright

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Re: American Innovation $1 Coins
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2018, 03:46:58 PM »
Bah humbug.

We went from three decades of stagnant designs (bicentennial quarters notwithstanding) to an explosion of circulating commemoratives. The statehood quarters were fun if not uninspired, and the America the Beautiful series is redundant, but at least interesting. The important thing is, people actually use them.

The Anthony, Sacagawea, and Presidential dollar coin series were all horrendous failures. I have never been given one in change, and back when I used to use them, about 1 in 10 cashiers would try to refuse them because they were totally unaware that dollar coins exist.

Americans for whatever reason have this cultural mindset that coins are to be put in a change jar to accumulate into a small emergency/vacation fund. We don't carry coins in our pockets for some reason. I don't know if having $1 or even $2 or $5 coins would change that.

First thing's first, it's time to tell the vending machine lobby to put on their big girl panties and adapt to change. No more manganese brass that tarnishes after a month of use.  No more coins that can easily be mistaken for a quarter. Make a nice hefty, maybe bimetallic coin that feels like a dollar, and maybe people will use them.

...all that along with stopping the $1 bill. When you don't have a choice, you will adapt. Thats how they moved to loonies and twoonies on this side of the border