Author Topic: Milled coins  (Read 1099 times)

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Offline Henk

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Re: Milled coins
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2018, 08:15:16 PM »
In The Netherlands there were initially many problems with the production of machine struck coins. In several instances recourse had to be made to the older manual methods for one or more of the production steps. After 1720-1750 the problems were mostly solved and coins were made using machines. The next step was taken in 1818 when steam was introduced in the Utrecht Mint (by then the only remaining mint in the Netherlands) and all 40 screw presses in used were being powered by steam. This lasted only a few years as in the early 1820's Uhlhorn presses were acquired. The development in minting techniques at the Utrecht, and other Netherlands Mint is described in: C. Hoitsema and Jhr. F. Feith, De Utechtsche Munt, uit haar verleden en heden. Utrecht (1912).

So there was no change in the method of production around 1795, from say 1750 to 1818 the techniques used for minting remained the same.

The screw presses were driven by Human energy until the introduction of steam. This was not only the case in Utrecht but also at the Tower Mint in London as is shown by the below drawing of a minting scene at the Tower Mint in the early 19th century.

The problem with automating screw pressing and to provide them with non-human power is that not only the up and down movement of the dies has to be automated but also the insertion and removal of the planchet. This problem was solved by Bolton and Watt in 1786 with their steam operated coining presses.

Of course there exist other means of striking eg. by rolling a strip of metal between dies or by a rocking process using a planchet. These methods are rather difficult to use and it is also difficult to make round coins. As this methods tends to yield oval coins. This method was used in Segovia and some other mints in Austria but never became widely used.

Offline Filat

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Re: Milled coins
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2018, 08:19:57 PM »
andyg: " My question - when did other European countries turn over to milled coins? "

Dates for the introduction of mechanized processing at European mints.

YV

Offline Filat

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Re: Milled coins
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2018, 06:14:21 PM »
For information (see link below):

1560 → "Eloy Mestrelle (?-1578) developed first screw press for the Tower Mint of Elizabeth I. ..."

https://medalblog.wordpress.com/2012/08/20/art-medal-timeline-notable-medallic-art-developments/


« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 08:48:30 AM by Filat »
YV

Offline capnbirdseye

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Re: Milled coins
« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2018, 06:37:59 PM »
Figleaf: " I have been looking for data and evidence of Russian use of water power for coinage. So far, all I have is a vague memory of reading they did. There may yet be a surprise coming from Russian history ..."

The mill in Moscow on the Yauza River (see link below).

http://www.coinsplanet.ru/mints/plaschilnaja-melnica.html


Google  translation of Russian link: ( a powder mill was for the production of gunpowder)

Year of foundation: 1727 Year of close: 1736 Location: Moscow After the abolition of Naberezhnaya MD (Copper), the need has opened for a new temporary plant to help the remaining Moscow money courtyards to mint copper money, as the production chambers of the Kadashevsky court were virtually destroyed.
For these purposes, there was once a powder mill, rising on the river Yauza which was converted into a plaschilnu where the rolling of copper and stamping of blanks for mints was carried out. Kadashevsky or naval mint. The first copper mugs - for the manufacture of kopecks at Kadashevsky, as well as the Red Yards - appeared here in 1728. In 1729, production stopped. For five years the plaschclinja stood idle. After the recognition of the state of the Kadashevsky MD chambers is unsatisfactory, the Coffer mill was made a mint (in 1734). From now on, they produced full-value coins - polushki and dengi. The fire that destroyed in 1735. the mill itself, did not stop production - wooden barns were already attached to the mill for various production cycles. The following year was the last for the court. The yard did not have its own symbolic designation.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2018, 10:04:12 AM by capnbirdseye »
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