Author Topic: The Coinage of Malaya  (Read 1310 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: The Coinage of Malaya
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2018, 12:44:54 PM »
The final coin of Malaya and British Borneo was the 1 cent coin of 1962. It was the only coin issued in that year, and it was a curiosity and an anomaly. Unlike the earlier 1 cent coin, it was round and not square, and it did not carry a portrait of the Queen on the obverse. The reverse carried no legend but featured a design by Barry Stanton of two ceremonial crossed swords.

The previous 1 cent, the square version, weighed 4.21 grams and was 20.0 mm in diameter. The round coin of 1962 weighed 1.94 g and was 17.7 mm in diameter.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2018, 12:20:43 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The Coinage of Malaya
« Reply #16 on: May 03, 2018, 12:53:51 PM »
On 16 September 1963, the Federation of Malaya, along with North Borneo, Sarawak and Singapore, became the new state of Malaysia. On 9 August 1965, Singapore was expelled from Malaysia and became independent.

See: Singapore in Malaysia.

Offline <k>

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Re: The Coinage of Malaya
« Reply #17 on: May 03, 2018, 12:58:16 PM »
A map of modern Malaysia.

Offline <k>

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Re: The Coinage of Malaya
« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2018, 01:00:00 PM »
A useful tree diagram from Wikipedia, showing the complex history of Malaysia.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: The Coinage of Malaya
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2018, 12:49:03 AM »
The two sharpies on the cent are not swords but daggers, called kris. They are not ceremonial, even when highly decorated, but part of a male. A kris has a personality of its own that supplements that of the owner. Two important rules guide its use. A kris drawn in anger may not be sheathed again until blood has flown (this is meant to make you think twice before drawing a kris). A kris must be cleansed by a shaman/priest when blood has flown in order to contain its anger (this means a fight will always cost money.)

The coins of Malaya were all struck in either of two mints only: London or Calcutta. Coins struck in Calcutta have a mintmark I (India.) There is only one copy known of the 10 cents 1945 I. It is unclear why or when it was made. The coins marked Malaya and British Borneo may be struck in London or Birmingham (KN or H mintmark). The marks are sometimes weakly punched or perhaps suffering from die filling. Interestingly, some African coins have a similar problem, but I have not heard of weak I mintmarks, so it was particular to Birmingham.

There are very good tin Burmese fakes of the larger Malay coins, presumably made for the opium trade.

I have a suspicion that the Malaya and British Borneo dollars were in fact pegged to USD, as its rate was constant at 0.3300 USD. In other words, the currency board reserves may have been largely in USD, rather than in GBP.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: The Coinage of Malaya
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2018, 01:01:02 AM »
The recent history of the Malay peninsula can only be understood through the concept of Bumiputra, a Malay person. This concept pits the Malays against immigrants, mostly Chinese and Indians. In practice, it amounts to racial discrimination. This explains why the "loss of power of the sultans" was so important to the Bumiputras. It explains the ambivalent attitude of Bumiputras towards the British, both colonisers and protectors. It explains fierce racial laws that remain strangely un-criticised. Most of all, it explains Singaporean independence, though Singapore instituted its own version, in their case protecting the Chinese majority from other "races".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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