Coinage of Eswatini (formerly Swaziland)

Started by <k>, April 30, 2018, 05:02:40 PM

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<k>

Swaziland 50c 1974.jpg

The reverse of the 50 cents featured the national coat of arms.
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<k>

Swaziland 1 lilangeni 1974.jpg


The 1 lilangeni was the highest denomination of the series.

The coin was round, 30 mm in diameter, and it weighed 11.65 grams.


The name lilangeni derives from emaLangeni ("people from the Sun").

It is used to describe the ancestors of the Swazi people.

They migrated to Swaziland in the 18th and 19th centuries.
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<k>

Swaziland 1 lilangeni 1979.jpg

The reverse of the 1 lilangeni coin featured a mother and child.
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<k>

#18


FAO-themed 1 cent coin, 1975.


1975 saw various FAO-themed versions of the coins.

A slogan was added to the standard designs on some of the lower denominations.

F.A.O. stands for Food and Agricultural Organization (of the United Nations).
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<k>

#19
Swaziland 2 cents 1975.jpg

FAO-themed 2 cents coin, 1975.
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<k>

#20
Swaziland 10c 1975=.jpg

FAO-themed 10 cents coin, 1975.
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<k>

#21


1 lilangeni coin, 1975.  International Women's Year.
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<k>

#22
Swaziland 1 lilangeni 1976.jpg

FAO-themed 1 lilangeni coin of 1976.
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<k>

#23
Swaziland 20  cents 1981.jpg

Swaziland, 20 cents, 1981.  Amaranth plant.


In 1981 two FAO-themed coins were issued for World Food Day.

Both were circulating commemorative coins.


The amaranth plant is known as imbuya in Swaziland.

It is regarded as a particularly nutritious vegetable.


Amaranth leaves.jpg

Leaves of the amaranth plant.
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<k>

#24


Swaziland, 1 lilangeni, 1981.  World Food Day.


A woman peeling maize.

A FAO-themed circulating commemorative coin.
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<k>

#25
Swaziland 2E 1981.jpg


In 1981 a special 2 emalageni circulating coin was issued.

It weighed 17 grams and was 34 mm in diameter.


The coin commemorated the Diamond Jubilee of King Sobhuza II.

The obverse and reverse were designed once more by Michael Rizzello.

The reverse featured two arum lilies.
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<k>

#26
DEATH OF KING SOBHUZA II.

From Wikipedia:

King Sobhuza II died on 21 August 1982 at Embo State house at the age of 83. Sobhuza's official reign of 82 years and 254 days is the longest precisely dated monarchical reign on record and the world's longest documented reign of any sovereign since antiquity.

Before his death he had appointed Prince Sozisa Dlamini to serve as 'Authorized Person', in order to advise a chosen regent. Selection of a successor was confirmed only after King Sobhuza's death. A regent was necessary if the heir remained under age at that time. By tradition, the regent would be one of the Queens Consort who had borne the late king a son. The first regent was Queen Dzeliwe, but after a power struggle Sozisa deposed her and she was replaced by Queen Ntfombi, who reigned on behalf of her young son by King Sobhuza, Prince Makhosetive Dlamini. He was designated as Crown Prince or Umntfwana. He was crowned King Mswati III in 1986.
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<k>

#27
King Mswati III 2014-.jpg

King Mswati III in 2014.


From Wikipedia:

Mswati III (born Makhosetive, 19 April 1968) is the king  of Eswatini and head of the Swazi royal family. He was born in Manzini, in the final days of the Protectorate of Swaziland, to King Sobhuza II and one of his younger wives, Ntfombi Tfwala. He was crowned as Mswati III, Ingwenyama and King of Swaziland, on 25 April 1986 at the age of 18, thus becoming the youngest ruling monarch in the world at that time. Together with his mother, Ntfombi Tfwala, now Queen Mother (Ndlovukati), he rules the country as an absolute monarch. Mswati III is known for his practice of polygamy, although at least two wives are appointed by the state, and he currently has 15 wives.
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<k>

Swaziland 250 1986.jpg


In 1986 a special non-circulating gold 250 emalangeni coin was issued.

It commemorated the accession of King Mswati III.

The obverse depicted the King, while the reverse featured the Queen Mother.


Like all the circulation coins up to that point, it was produced by the Royal Mint (UK).

The portraits were designed and modelled by Royal Mint artist, Robert Elderton.
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<k>

#29
Swaziland 1 Lilangeni 1986 .jpg

1 lilangeni, 1986.


The portraits on the 250 emalangeni collector coin were used on the new 1 lilangeni coin.

It was now made of nickel-brass.

It was also much smaller than before, with a diameter of 22.5 mm.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.