Coinage of Eswatini (formerly Swaziland)

Started by <k>, April 30, 2018, 05:02:40 PM

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<k>

Swaziland map.gif

Map of Swaziland.



Map of Southern Africa.


From Wikipedia:

Swaziland or eSwatini, officially the Kingdom of eSwatini, is a sovereign state in Southern Africa. It is bordered by Mozambique to its northeast and by South Africa to its north, west and south; it is a landlocked country. The country and its people take their names from Mswati II, the 19th-century king under whose rule Swazi territory was expanded and unified.

The country is an absolute diarchy, ruled jointly by Ngwenyama ("King") Mswati III and Ndlovukati ("Queen Mother") Ntfombi Tfwala since 1986. The former is administrative head of state and appoints the country's prime ministers and a number of representatives of both chambers (Senate and House of Assembly) in the country's parliament. The latter, meanwhile, is the national head of state.

At no more than 200 kilometres (120 mi) north to south and 130 kilometres (81 mi) east to west, Swaziland is one of the smallest countries in Africa. The population of around 1,343,000 consists primarily of ethnic Swazis whose language is Swati. They established their kingdom in the mid-18th century under the leadership of Ngwane III; the present boundaries were drawn up in 1881 in the midst of the scramble for Africa. After the Anglo-Boer War, Swaziland was a British protectorate from 1903, until it regained its independence on 6 September 1968.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Swaziland coat of arms.jpg


From Wikipedia:

The coat of arms of Swaziland is a coat of arms depicting various symbols for traditional Swaziland culture. The lion represents the King and the elephant represents the Queen-mother. They support a traditional Nguni shield which represents "protection". Above the shield is the king's lidlabe, or crown of feathers, normally worn during Ncwala (the festival of the harvest). On a banner below the shield is the Swaziland national motto, Siyinqaba, meaning, "We are the fortress".



I have seen various forms of the coat of arms, in which the elephant and lion look rather different from the ones in this image.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Swaziland flag.jpg


From Wikipedia:

The red in the Swazi flag stands for past battles, the blue for peace and stability, and the yellow for the resources of Swaziland. The central focus of the flag is a Nguni shield and two spears, symbolizing protection from the country's enemies. Its colour is meant to show that white and black people live in peaceful coexistence in Swaziland.

The flag has five horizontal stripes - two blue strips at the top and bottom while the center stripe is red. Two thin yellow strips border the red stripe. On the red strip is an ox hide combat shield from the traditional Swazi Emasotsha Regiment, laid horizontally. The shield is reinforced by a staff from which hangs injobo tassels-bunches of feathers of the widowbird and the lourie. They also decorate the shield. These feathers are used only by the king.

Above the staff are two assegais-local spears, a Swazi fighting stick and three royal Swazi ornamental tassels called tinjobo, which are made from widow bird and loury feathers.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3
King Sobhuza II.jpg

King Sobhuza II.


From Wikipedia:

Sobhuza II, KBE (22 July 1899 – 21 August 1982) was the Paramount Chief and later King of Swaziland for 82 years and 254 days, the longest verifiable reign of any monarch in recorded history. Sobhuza was born on 22 July 1899 at Zombodze Royal Residence, the son of Inkhosikati Lomawa Ndwandwe and King Ngwane V. When he was only four months old, his father died suddenly. Sobhuza was chosen king soon after that and his grandmother Labotsibeni and his uncle Prince Malunge led the Swazi nation until his maturity in 1921 Sobhuza led Swaziland through independence until his death in 1982.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 1974 Swaziland issued its first national circulation coins. They were produced by the Royal Mint (UK) and designed by Royal Mint numismatic artist Michael Rizzello. One ligangeni was now equal to 100 cents. Coins for 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents and 1 lilangeni were introduced, with the 1 and 2 cents struck in bronze and the others struck in copper-nickel.

The lilangeni was introduced at par with the South African rand throughout the Common Monetary Area, to which it remains tied at a one-to-one exchange rate.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5
Swaziland 1 cent  1974-.jpg

Obverse of the 1 cent coin.


The common obverse of the coins showed a portrait of King Sobhuza II.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#6
Swaziland 1 cent  1974--.jpg


The reverse of the 1 cent coin featured a pineapple.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Swaziland 2 cents  1974.jpg


The reverse of the 2 cents featured a leadwood tree (Combretum imberbe).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9
Swaziland 5c 1974.jpg

The obverse of the 5 cents coin.


This coin was scalloped, with twelve notches, and made of copper-nickel.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



The reverse of the 5 cents featured an arum lily.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#11
Swaziland 10  cents  1974.jpg

The obverse of the 10 cents coin.


This coin was scalloped, with eight notches, and made of copper-nickel.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Swaziland 20c 1979.jpg


The reverse of the 10 cents featured sugar cane.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Swaziland 20 cents  1974--.jpg

The reverse of the copper-nickel 20 cents featured an elephant's head.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14
Swaziland 50 cents  1979.jpg

The obverse of the 50 cents coin.


This coin was 12-sided and made of copper-nickel.

It was large, with a diameter of 29.5 mm and a weight of 8.76 grams.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.