Author Topic: Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge  (Read 469 times)

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Offline <k>

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Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge
« on: April 20, 2018, 03:11:21 PM »
Iceland issued a whole collector set of coins, without an apparent denomination - until you looked on the edge.


See: Iceland 1930 Althing 1000 Years Commemmorative Set.





The image below of the edge inscription on the 10 kronur coin is courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2018, 07:51:47 AM »
Can't think of any other examples, probably because you wouldn't normally do that. The denomination is important info you'd rather want to highlight, unless the pieces are not designed for circulation. There are a few coins that have their weight and/or metallic content on the edge...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge
« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2018, 11:25:56 AM »
There are a few coins that have their weight and/or metallic content on the edge...

Please name a few such coins.

(Try to avoid the meaningless "..." meme, which seems to be spreading - even chrisild is now doing it.)

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2018, 02:58:38 PM »
... is punctuation meaning "hoping for (or expecting) a reaction". On the net, you may see a search field labelled something like "Insert search term ..." In a software menu "Save" is a command, while "Save as ..." opens a window with further options. In trumpspeech, it means "this rant continues in my next tweet because 280 chars isn't enough to vent my daily anger - though Trump, being a bad speller, usually types .... :-*

Typically, Russian silver coins mention a weight on the edge e.g the poltina 1832-1858 has:
СЕРебряный 83 1/3 ПРОБЫ 2 ЗОЛотни́к. 41 7/25 ДОЛя.
Silver 83 ⅓ (0.8333 fine) proof 2 Zolotnik 41 7/25 Dolia.

There are 96 dolia in a zolotnik; a dolium is 0.044 grams and a zolotnik is 4.2658 grams. The weight given therefore translates to about 10.3479 grams.

The rouble's edge says:
СЕР∙83 1/3 ПРОБЫ 4 ЗОЛ∙82 14/25 ДОЛИ

So it is the same fineness, but exactly double the weight of the poltina.

In Soviet times, the edge of the rubels of 1921 and 1922 says:
ЧИСТОГО СЕРЕБРА 4 ЗОЛОТНИКА 21 ДОЛЯ
Pure silver 4 zolotniks 21 dolia. The first communist ruble is in fact 0.900 fine and at 17.987 a tad lighter.

The notation was discontinued after 1922 as a consequence of hyper-inflation.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2018, 04:01:37 PM »
... is punctuation meaning "hoping for (or expecting) a reaction". On the net, you may see a search field labelled something like "Insert search term ..." In a software menu "Save" is a command, while "Save as ..." opens a window with further options. In trumpspeech, it means "this rant continues in my next tweet because 280 chars isn't enough to vent my daily anger - though Trump, being a bad speller, usually types .... :-*

Logic unacceptable. Brexit logic. You are hereby expelled from the European Union.

Quote
Typically, Russian silver coins mention a weight on the edge e.g the poltina 1832-1858 has:
СЕРебряный 83 1/3 ПРОБЫ 2 ЗОЛотни́к. 41 7/25 ДОЛя.
Silver 83 ⅓ (0.8333 fine) proof 2 Zolotnik 41 7/25 Dolia.

Thank you.  :)

Offline chrisild

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Re: Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2018, 04:29:36 PM »
Can't think of any other examples, probably because you wouldn't normally do that.

Since those Icelandic pieces are not actually and have never been coins (see the older topic that <k> linked to), that makes sense. ;)  Then again, had the government ever declared them to be legal tender, they would still have been collector coins only, and the face value would have played a (relatively) minor role ...

Christian

Offline Stef

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Re: Coins with the denomination shown only on the edge
« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2018, 07:05:34 PM »
СЕРебряный 83 1/3 ПРОБЫ 2 ЗОЛотни́к. 41 7/25 ДОЛя. Silver 83 ⅓ (0.8333 fine) proof 2 Zolotnik 41 7/2 Dolia.
Small correction. In this context проба means fineness not proof. It is not metric so it should be more than 0.8333, roughly 0.868.
The notation was discontinued after 1922 as a consequence of hyper-inflation.
I'm not sure about the inflation. The coins were put in circulation in 1924 as part of the currency reform. The coins from 1924-1925 also have similar texts. I do no have the catalogs at the moment to be more specific.