Author Topic: Eravisci denarius  (Read 277 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Eravisci denarius
« on: April 10, 2018, 01:36:08 PM »
Recently I found this interesting denarius issued by the Eravisci, a Celtic tribe, considered part of the late La Tne culture. Apparently they were settled in the 2nd century BC at the Ipoly river (now in Slovakia), a tributary to the Danube, until they were dislodged by a powerful Celtic tribe, the Boii, about 70 BC. Thereafter they settled on the right bank of the Danube between the bend to the south (at Vc) and Budapest, where they established an important hill fort. (There are other theories, too).
They had a well-developed culture and thrived on trade with the Romans. In their time maybe not so important and independent for only a few decades, this tribe issued a number of interesting coins imitating denarii of the Roman Republic. This one is in excellent condition and may be clearly compared to its example, a denarius of L. Roscius Fabatus dating from 64 BC.

Danubian Celts: Eravisci. About 60-50 BC. AR denarius. Imitating a Roman Republican denarius of L. Roscius Fabatus, issued in 64 BC.
Obv. Head of Juno Sospita right in goatskin headdress, branch behind, C. before chin.
Rev. Abstract representation of a female figure (right) confronting an uncoiling snake (left). At the right, (a modius with measure became) > a large dot surrounded by three small dots. In exergue, (FABATI became) > unreadable lettering. 19 mm, 3.13 gr.
Freeman, Essays Hersh, 14-16. BMC Celtic S247. (I haven't seen these).

-- Paul


Offline Figleaf

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Re: Eravisci denarius
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2018, 08:51:09 AM »
I am reminded of a test, in which a student was asked to copy a shape he didn't know (the silhouet of an Egyptian vase IIRC). The copy was given to another student with the same instructions. After several iterations, the unknown vase had changed into a known sitting cat.

The headdress and face were known quantities and copied. The unknown attribute behind the head became a known branch with leaves. The goddess or personification was no problem, but the snake became a rope and the letters geometrical shapes.

I haven't located the C at the chin, but I believe you. ;)

Peter
« Last Edit: April 11, 2018, 03:38:44 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Eravisci denarius
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2018, 11:21:10 AM »
Well, the drawing certainly helped me to understand the goat head cap, that was not so clear on the real Fabatus coins I saw. How do you fit your head in a goat's head? I'm not going to try.

The C is here, behind the black spots. It's not very clear - more so in other coins of this type I saw.

-- Paul