Author Topic: 1813 Jersey tokens  (Read 262 times)

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Offline mrbadexample

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1813 Jersey tokens
« on: March 18, 2018, 06:42:31 PM »
Jersey 3 shillings token, KM#Tn6.

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: 1813 Jersey tokens
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2018, 06:43:59 PM »
18 pence token, KM#Tn5

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: 1813 Jersey tokens
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2018, 06:45:57 PM »
1 penny token, Jersey, Guernsey & Alderney. KM#Tn4


Online Figleaf

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Re: 1813 Jersey tokens
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2018, 09:41:57 AM »
Nice to see them together, but the silver tokens have a different background. The inscription "States of Jersey" refers to an order in council that made the silver tokens official. At the time, the channel islands were not covered by UK law, so the states of Jersey had the right to do this.

Nevertheless, the States were following the British example. In 1811, the Bank of England issued tokens for 3 s and 1/6 (36 an 18 pence respectively), underweight, compared to the 1804 issue of counterstamped captured Spanish "dollars". This is the model the States of Jersey followed. As in Britain, the quantity of silver tokens issued was inadequate, more so as the industrial revolution and small wage jobs created demand for small change. In Britain, as in the Channel Islands, the "official tokens" were made scarcer because they were widely melted to provide silver for even lighter privately issued silver tokens. The names of Henry Morgan* and Thomas Halliday were linked to this tendency.

Copper tokens were officially ignored, so there was an abundant supply of lightweight, privately issued copper tokens, many without an address where they could be exchanged for coin of the realm. Your penny, produced by Thomas Halliday, is one of them. It had nobody's stamp of approval, carried a popular motive (the Prince of Wales' feathers, referring to the later George IV, prince regent since 1811) for commercial reasons only and had no return address.

Peter


* The mystery of Henry Morgan by Andrew Wager explores the identity of Henry Morgan.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.