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1813 Jersey tokens

Started by mrbadexample, March 18, 2018, 06:42:31 PM

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mrbadexample

Jersey 3 shillings token, KM#Tn6.

mrbadexample

#1
18 pence token, KM#Tn5

mrbadexample

1 penny token, Jersey, Guernsey & Alderney. KM#Tn4


Figleaf

Nice to see them together, but the silver tokens have a different background. The inscription "States of Jersey" refers to an order in council that made the silver tokens official. At the time, the channel islands were not covered by UK law, so the states of Jersey had the right to do this.

Nevertheless, the States were following the British example. In 1811, the Bank of England issued tokens for 3 s and 1/6 (36 an 18 pence respectively), underweight, compared to the 1804 issue of counterstamped captured Spanish "dollars". This is the model the States of Jersey followed. As in Britain, the quantity of silver tokens issued was inadequate, more so as the industrial revolution and small wage jobs created demand for small change. In Britain, as in the Channel Islands, the "official tokens" were made scarcer because they were widely melted to provide silver for even lighter privately issued silver tokens. The names of Henry Morgan* and Thomas Halliday were linked to this tendency.

Copper tokens were officially ignored, so there was an abundant supply of lightweight, privately issued copper tokens, many without an address where they could be exchanged for coin of the realm. Your penny, produced by Thomas Halliday, is one of them. It had nobody's stamp of approval, carried a popular motive (the Prince of Wales' feathers, referring to the later George IV, prince regent since 1811) for commercial reasons only and had no return address.

Peter


* The mystery of Henry Morgan by Andrew Wager explores the identity of Henry Morgan.
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

hkfears

For more information about the 1813 Jersey tokens, check out my site at: http://jerseycoins.com/jer_tokens/token.htm

mrbadexample

Quote from: hkfears on April 16, 2021, 06:58:32 PM
For more information about the 1813 Jersey tokens, check out my site at: http://jerseycoins.com/jer_tokens/token.htm

Hi Harold, hope you are well?

I'm already familiar with your site, thanks. It was me that emailed you asking about the 1858 1/26th penny that I thought may have been struck from the proof dies. The site has been an invaluable resource for me.  ;)

hkfears

Jersey 1813 half penny

hkfears

Jersey 1813 half penny

Figleaf

#8
Thank you for posting those pictures. In my experience, all Channel island tokens of this period are hard to find, let alone in good condition.

The legend "To facilitate trade" is of course a way to say "non-refundable". This is all the funnier because  at this time, the Jersey penny was worth less than the UK penny. As a consequence, unwary visitors would pay with UK money, overpay on advertised prices and get change in Jersey pennies. ;D Note how the token doesn't specify what kind of penny it represents, but imitates the style of its contemporary UK tokens. AFAIK, the Prince of Wales had no special connection with the Channel islands.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

hkfears

The obverse of the Jersey Bank Token

hkfears

The reverse of the Jersey Bank Token

You can see more at my site at http://jerseycoins.com/ .

Figleaf

A lovely gem. My first impression was that it showed some pantograph lines, but they are guides for the engraver, two circles, one above, the other below the lettering on both sides. The detail is abundant and fantastic. Patience in the face of the knowledge that much of the detail will be so small that the vast majority of those who will handle the token wouldn't even notice it. I don't know if it occurs on similar Britannia reverses, but I can't remember ever having seen the castle right above her big toe, towers, keep and even a curtain wall.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Manzikert

I think she is Commerce or Trade, seated on a bale of goods and with cornucopia and scales, but I have to agree an absolutely stunningly detailed piece (and a lovely specimen). Presumably a Boulton product with the H on the bust?

Alan

FosseWay

Isn't she Fortune? Same lass as was shown on the Australian token we were discussing a few days ago? Only the Jersey one has learnt to hold the cornucopia the right way up!  :D

Figleaf

It's a mixed message. The figure is based on Britannia, but instead of the rock (isolation by water), there is the wool bale (textile trade), instead of the trident (ready for war), she holds the cornucopia (wealth) and instead of the shield (ready to defend its interests), there's the balance (trade). My interpretation is that the message is something like "trade brings wealth to Britannia". A somewhat parallel message is the wool sack of the speaker of the upper house.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.