Author Topic: Paper money, yet not banknotes  (Read 4069 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Paper money, yet not banknotes
« on: January 02, 2009, 02:58:45 PM »
Inspired by this thread, I thought I'd post some paper "coins". Here is the French contribution, a series of 5 and 10 centimes tokens issued by the Crédit Lyonnais, a bank that still existed when I last checked. Small change was practically impossible to get in France in the years following the first world war, due to a silly policy that held that Germany was to compensate all war damage. Tokens filled the void. CL encased stamps so their customers wouldn't lose a centime when the emergency was over and took the opportunity to advertise themselves and a national loan at 6%. The cases are the same, only the stamps differ.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 02:45:04 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2009, 04:10:42 PM »
Here is the Danish contribution. Same period, same idea, except that the cases advertise tobacco.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 02:48:37 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2009, 04:26:48 PM »
The idea was simplified when at the outbreak of the second world war, Denmark found itself without 1 øre pieces. The frames were replaced by a simple cellophane wrap. The ads are widely different, from banks (like this one), radios and suits to newspapers, stamp shops and quite a few brands of rye bread. By contrast, colours were restricted to black, purplish blue, green, dark red, orange and yellow. This is coloured money that did circulate.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 02:47:26 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2009, 04:46:21 PM »
Spain's fascists kept it old style during the civil war. No ads either.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 02:46:54 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2009, 05:00:23 PM »
Not sure if this one was issued by their opponents, but maybe so. Don Quijote would not be a nationalist hero. The ad is for a Barcelona shoe shop.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 01, 2019, 02:46:12 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2009, 07:22:35 PM »
And in about 1916, Russia printed stamps on cardboard to enable them to circulate without getting crumpled - they printed some text on what would normally have been the adhesive side explaining their monetary purpose, if I remember correctly.  I have a set somewhere - will see if I can find it.

translateltd

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2009, 10:41:23 PM »
And in about 1916, Russia printed stamps on cardboard to enable them to circulate without getting crumpled - they printed some text on what would normally have been the adhesive side explaining their monetary purpose, if I remember correctly.  I have a set somewhere - will see if I can find it.

I notice muntenman mentioned these here:

http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,214.msg558.html#msg558

Here are mine:



The right-hand example in each case shows the common "other side"; in the top row it's a second 15 kopek, in the bottom a 3 kopek.

« Last Edit: January 06, 2009, 11:18:54 PM by Figleaf »

BC Numismatics

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Paper money, yet not banknotes.
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2009, 12:21:56 AM »
America was actually the first country to issued encased stamp tokens.They were issued just after the Civil War,due to a coin shortage.The stamps were placed behind mica windows.

The British Armed Forces use a series of laminated paper tokens,which circulate as substitutes for coins.You can see them at http://www.efipogs.com .Unfortunately,these are not listed in the Pick catalogue like the American ones are.The first issues have the denominations expressed in Cents with the later issues having the denomination expressed in Euro-Cents.

Aidan.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2009, 12:49:31 AM »
This article comes with a picture of another "stamp coin":
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briefmarkenkapselgeld

By the way, there were also "banknotes" that had stamps attached:
http://www.moneypedia.de/index.php/Briefmarkengeld

But apparently the production was fairly costly, so such "stamp notes" have not been very successful.

Christian

BC Numismatics

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Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2009, 12:57:25 AM »
Bulawayo issued a series of stamp card banknotes in 1900.These are listed in the Pick Specialised catalogue as banknotes,but incorrectly under 'South Africa'.These very rare notes are regarded as being the very first Rhodesian banknotes.I have got one of the 6d. ones in my collection.

Aidan.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2009, 01:05:03 AM »
Thanks, Christian. I'l be looking out for German and Austrian encased stamps now. Thanks to Martin & Aidan, I'll be looking for Russians too. Those American thingies are a bit expensive.

I noticed the Wikipedia article doesn't mention Denmark and Spain. My German isn't good enough, but if you want to that story to the lemma, go ahead. You can use the scans too if you want, though they are disfigured by the light effects ...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

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Paper money, yet not banknotes.
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2009, 01:12:15 AM »
Peter,
  Have you thought about using a flatbed scanner to scan your banknotes & coins? I have used a Canon CanoScan LiDE 25 for doing my banknote & coin photos,then using Photoscape to edit the photos & combining them.

Aidan.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Paper money, yet not banknotes
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2009, 01:42:56 AM »
The Canoscan 30 was my previous scanner. I am using a more advanced model now (MP 210).

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.