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Numismatic heritage: commemorative designs that became standard designs

Started by <k>, March 05, 2018, 12:32:45 PM

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Oklahoman

The 1932 dated Washington 25 cents of the USA celebrated the 200th Anniversary of Washington's birth.  Then in 1934, that design became the circulating design for the quarter.

<k>



Central African States, 1000 francs, 2002.  Collector coin to commemorate the birth of the euro.


See: .


Central African States 2006.jpg

In 2006 the design on the reverse of the coin above was used for the standard circulation coins.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Iceland, 1968, 50 kronur.

50th anniversary of independence.  Parliament Building, Reykjavik.





Iceland, 50 kronur, 1980.  Regular circulation coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

In 330 AD, the Roman empire issued a commemorative for the foundation of Constantinople on 11th May on order of Constantine the Great. The coin figured on the obverse a helmeted bust of Roma left wearing the imperial mantle and on the reverse a she-wolf, feeding Romulus and Remus, illustrating the myth of the founding of the city or Rome.

In the following years, the design was struck in a number of different mints throughout the empire. These are therefore not commemoratives, but circulating coins. There are several types known that can be distinguished by a mark on the upper part of the neck of the wolf.

See this thread.

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

A coronation commemorative 2½ gulden dated 1898 became the prototype of the first series of silver coins of Wilhelmina. The smaller coins are all circulation coins. See this thread.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

In 1934 Germany issued commemorative 2 and 5 RM coins which showed the Potsdam Garrison Church and the date 21 March 1933 (see here for the background).

A little later, the 5 RM piece was also issued without the date. Mintage was much higher, it was also minted in the following year ... and production may have be continued beyond that, except that quite a few people misused the empty space for political messages. ;)

<k>

Quote from: chrisild on January 06, 2023, 03:21:13 PMIn 1934 Germany issued commemorative 2 and 5 RM coins which showed the Potsdam Garrison Church and the date 21 March 1933 (see here for the background).

A little later, the 5 RM piece was also issued without the date.

Yet still Numista calls the later version (without the date 21 March 1933 on the reverse) a circulating commemorative coin. The dateless reverse looks too bare, of course, making its origins too obvious.

It reminds me of the Solomon Islands 50 cents coin of 1988 (see post #5 in this topic), which similarly had a legend all too obviously removed.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Quote from: <k> on January 06, 2023, 03:45:25 PMYet still Numista calls the later version (without the date 21 March 1933 on the reverse) a circulating commemorative coin. The dateless reverse looks too bare, of course, making its origins too obvious.

Maybe that is why Numista uses that (not really correct) commem label. The site is a mess anyway ;) when you try finding a specific Deutsches Reich coin by simply browsing – every single pattern piece, even the ones that Goetz made without participating in any design competition, is listed there. Makes it fairly hard to find the actual coins.

<k>

Quote from: chrisild on January 06, 2023, 04:21:55 PMwhen you try finding a specific Deutsches Reich coin by simply browsing – every single pattern piece, even the ones that Goetz made without participating in any design competition, is listed there. Makes it fairly hard to find the actual coins.

Numista has very useful filters these days:

Go to 'Germany', click on 'Edit filters', select 'Circulating commemorative coin' and enter 1934-1935 in 'Gregorian date' :

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/index.php?e=germany&r=&ct=coin&im1=&im2=&tc=y&cat=y&ru=&ca=3&no=&v=&i=&b=&d=&u=&a=&dg=1934-1935&m=&f=&t=&w=&mt=&g=&se=
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Cool, thanks! Will keep that in mind. I still think that the Garrison Church "without date" should be listed as a regular circulation coin, but that is their decision. Focusing on certain dates will he helpful though. (Side note: It still is odd that, on one hand, Taiwan is not in the list of countries but in some special category, while on the other hand such differentiations are not made at all when it comes to coins vs trial pieces vs private products. Rant over. ;) )