Author Topic: Numismatic heritage: commemorative designs that became standard designs  (Read 849 times)

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Online <k>

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Belize, 250 dollars, 1989.  500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of the New World.

This was a gold coin.
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Belize. $1, 1990. Columbus's fleet.

The design became the reverse of a standard circulation dollar.
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Mauritius, 10 rupees, 1981.  A collector coin commemorating World Food Day.







The FAO-themed design of 1981 was reprised on the heptagonal circulation 10 rupees, first issued by Mauritius in 1997.
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Tanzania, 100 shilingi, 1986.  WWF-themed collector coin.
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Tanzania, 20 shilingi, 1990.  Standard circulation coin.
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Solomon Islands, 50 cents, 1988.  10th anniversary of independence.





In 1989 the special legend was removed, and the coin became a new circulating denomination.
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Jordan, ¼ dinar, 1969.  F.A.O.





Jordan, ¼ dinar, 1974.  10th anniversary of the Central Bank.





Jordan, ¼ dinar, 1978.  Standard circulation coin.  It was also issued in 1981 and 1985.
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Offline Oklahoman

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The 1932 George Washington Bicentennial circulating commemorative became the standard designed circulation quarter in 1934.

Online <k>

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Swaziland, 2 emalangeni, 1981.  The King's Diamond Jubilee.  Reverse design: arum lily.
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Swaziland, 2 emalangeni, 2008.

An amended version of the arum lily design was adopted for the circulation 2 emalangeni coin, which was first issued in 1995.

The coin in the image is dated 2008.
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Online <k>

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Re: Numismatic heritage: commemorative designs that became standard designs
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2020, 01:04:22 AM »


Paraguay, gold 250 000 guaraníes collector coin of 1987.





Paraguay, 500 guaraníes, 1997 - a circulation coin.





Paraguay, 500 guaraníes, 1997 to 2005 - a circulation coin.





Paraguay, silver 1 guaraní commemorative collector coin, 2002.





Paraguay, 500 guaraníes circulation coin, issued from 2006 onward. Smaller and in a different metal.



See: Paraguay: from commemorative to circulation coin and back again.
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Numismatic heritage: commemorative designs that became standard designs
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2020, 10:42:57 AM »
Of the above, I find the FAO and WWF coins that turned into regular circulating issue the most significant. I expect that there will be more of those. The international organisations subsidised the development of a coin to advertise their own goals and the country rode piggy-back on that development to get a cheap version of an attractive coin for themselves.

However, there is a more subtle movement behind the money saving motive. By adopting the designs, the countries aligned their national values with an international value: not accepting hunger or protecting wildlife. That is a small, but nice plus for the world as well as progress for the population and the government of the country in question.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online <k>

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Re: Numismatic heritage: commemorative designs that became standard designs
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2020, 02:18:55 PM »
Of the above, I find the FAO and WWF coins that turned into regular circulating issue the most significant. I expect that there will be more of those. The international organisations subsidised the development of a coin to advertise their own goals and the country rode piggy-back on that development to get a cheap version of an attractive coin for themselves.

I have never heard of FAO or WWF subsidising coins or coin designs. On the contrary, FAO sometimes received a small percentage of the profit on sales. See here.

It was far more often the case that a regular circulation coin was minted with a regular design, then a few years later that design had a FAO slogan added. See Jamaica and Swaziland (1970s coins) for examples. In other cases, a regular coin / denomination was only ever minted with a FAO slogan, e.g. the 5, 25 and 100 francs coins of Comoros.

Occasionally a new circulating denomination was minted from the beginning with a FAO slogan (Zambia, 12-sided 50 ngwee of 1969 and 1972) but the legend was later dropped (Zambia, 12-sided 50 ngwee of 1972 to 1983 - independence commemorative; and Zambia, 12-sided 50 ngwee of 1985 - UN commemorative).

In 1981 the Seychelles issued two new circulation types with new designs: 5 and 10 cents coins with a World Food Day slogan. In 1982 the slogan was dropped from the designs, and these now standard circulation coins were joined by another new circulation type (not FAO in this case) of a 1 cent coin depicting a crab. So it was probably planned that the designs would briefly commemorate World Food Day before becoming standard coins. See Wildlife of the Seychelles.
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