Altered legend with same or similar design

Started by <k>, February 10, 2018, 02:15:50 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

It still leaves the question, free from WHAT? Looking through the Wikipedia article you linked to, I found only this:

Nearly 10 years earlier, Michael Collins had argued that the treaty would give "the freedom to achieve freedom".

That is a pretty meaningless piece of rhetoric. Given the Irish Free State was still constitutionally a monarchy, I suggest that its title was a nice piece of propaganda spin, to win over any critics who would ideally have preferred a republic. There's nothing wrong with that, of course - there are times in politics when you have to go slowly, in order to move closer to your ultimate aim.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Quote from: chrisild on March 13, 2018, 02:17:26 PM
Saorst√°t √Čireann was still a monarchy, with (initially) George V as its head of state

That answers the question, I think. Ireland as a monarchy was in the same position as Hamburg or Frankfurt: an independent position with a (pretty powerless) head of state common with other political entities around it only. That makes it logical that the free state was succeeded by the Irish republic: unlike the constitution of 1922, the text of 1937 created the office of an (also pretty powerless) president.

The answer to what was it free of is therefore: the British parliament.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

#77
Bahamas $2500 1983.jpg

Bahamas, $2500, 1983.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#78



Tonga 2 pa'anga 1978.jpg


Tonga 1 pa'anga 1978.jpg


Tonga 1 pa'anga  1981.jpg


Are you turning 60? Call it your "Diamond Birthday".

It'll sound much more important and you'll receive much better presents.  :D 

That's what the King of Tonga did in 1978, anyway.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#79


Biafra, 1 shilling, 1969.





Biafra, 1 shilling, 1969.


Two versions of the Biafran shilling. The denomination is given numerically on one, and in words on the other.

The tree and the sun are also significantly different on the reverse. There are also slight differences in the font.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#80


Singapore, $10, 1972.


The English language version of "Singapore" was placed upside-down on the obverse of this coin. Was this a deliberate snub?  :o
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#81
Singapore $10 1973.jpg


In subsequent years, the English legend was turned "right side up".

Perhaps somebody had threatened a world war in the meantime?  :-X
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#82
Singapore $10 1975.jpg

Singapore, $10, 1975. 


Here the legend around the coat of arms is changed to "10TH ANNIVERSARY".

This is the only coin that references the country as "REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE", to my knowledge.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#83
Guernsey 25p 1978.jpg


In 1978 Queen Elizabeth II visited Guernsey: a crown dependency, no less.

Guernsey issued a 25 pence collector coin to commemorate the visit.

However, only the reverse legend indicated the event being commemorated. How disappointing.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#84


Cook Islands, $1. The standard collector design of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.


Cook Islands $1 1985.jpg

Here you see the altered legend to promote the Mini Games, whatever they were.

When I look at the design, the concept of "MINI" just does not suggest itself, somehow.  :-[
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#85
BVI obverse 1976.jpg


In the 1970s and 1980s, the Franklin Mint produced coin sets for the British Virgin Islands.

These looked like circulation sets and had denominations going from 1 cent to 1 dollar.

There were higher denominations for more expensive sets.

However, none of these coins circulated, since BVI uses the US dollar.


BVI obverse 1978.jpg

Nonetheless, the Franklin Mint changed the obverse legend on these pieces in 1978.


BVI 1977.jpg

This legend was to celebrate the Queen's silver jubilee in 1977.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#86
Swaziland 5 E 2008.jpg


Swaziland 5 E 2008~.jpg

Swaziland, 2008.  40th anniversary of independence and 40th birthday of the king.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#87





Cayman Islands, $5, 1988.  Seoul Olympics. Design by Robert Elderton.


See also: Cayman Islands, Seoul Olympics, 1988.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#88
Cayman Islands $5 1982.jpg

Cayman Islands, $5, 1982.  150th Anniversary of Parliamentary Government.


Cayman Islands $5 1972.jpg

Cayman Islands, $5, 1972.  Standard collector issue (in sets only).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#89
Cayman Islands $5 1978.jpg

Cayman Islands, $5, 1978.  25th anniversary of the Queen's Coronation.


Cayman Islands $5 1980.jpg

Cayman Islands, $5, 1980.  Standard collector issue (in sets only).

The reverse of both coins showed the standard collector design, as seen in the prior post.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.