Author Topic: Fractional units  (Read 7601 times)

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Offline Pabitra

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2016, 07:03:11 AM »
French Indo China 1/4 cent

Offline mrbadexample

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #31 on: April 05, 2016, 10:20:27 PM »
Sweden 2/3 skilling. Also available in 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/6 and 1/12. I like the 2/3 best though. :)

Online Figleaf

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #32 on: April 05, 2016, 10:49:07 PM »
Lots of pretty expensive ⅔ taler coins in North German states. It was a useful denomination to convert Northern German silver into Southern German silver or vice versa.

Lots of 2½ cent and 2½ gulden coins in Dutch and Dutch colonial numismatics. The 2½ cent coins are a remnant of the Habsburg's binary system in which a stuiver was worth 8 duiten, so 2½ cent was 4 duiten. The 2½ gulden was the successor of the pre-decimal rijksdaalder of 50 stuivers. As the stuiver was equivalent to 5 decimal cent. the 2½ gulden also contained 50 stuivers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #33 on: April 06, 2016, 07:27:01 PM »
Lots of pretty expensive ⅔ taler coins in North German states. It was a useful denomination to convert Northern German silver into Southern German silver or vice versa.


Not sure about expensive, but here is my only representative of such coins - ⅔ Taler from Hannover.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #34 on: April 06, 2016, 07:31:00 PM »
I haven't got any to illustrate, but in late medieval England there were at various times coins with the value of 13s 4d, or ⅔ of a pound, which was also equal to the mark, a unit of account. It was of course one of the strengths of the £sd and similar systems that a wide range of fractions was possible in "round" numbers - i.e. whole numbers of pence.

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #35 on: April 07, 2016, 08:59:45 PM »
Mauritania 1/5 Ougiya

Offline Abhay

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #36 on: April 08, 2016, 05:37:41 AM »
Sorry that this is not a coin but a currency note - a 2 1/2 Rupee Note from the British India Period.

You will see that the Rupee Denomination is 2 Rupee and 8 Anna, which in itself is not a fractional denomination. But if you recall, 1 rupee was equal to 16 Annas, and hence the denomination is also 2 1/2 Rupee.

This rupee note has a panel, which indicates the denomination in several Indian Regional languages, and in many of them, the denomination is indicated as "ADHAI RUPAYA" meaning 2 and half rupee.

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

Offline <k>

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #37 on: September 03, 2019, 09:21:11 PM »


Turks and Caicos, 1981, ¼ crown.   Crayfish.





The half crown of the set featured a salt windmill on the reverse. The islands have a history of salt production.



In 1981 the territory issued a two coin set for collectors. The obverse featured the Machin portrait of the Queen.

The denominations were a quarter crown and a half crown. Is the quarter crown a unique denomination among world coins?

The reverse of the quarter crown featured a Caribbean spiny lobster (Panuliras argus). The coin was 24 mm in diameter and equal in value to a US quarter.

More than one person has told me that these coins circulated on the islands.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #38 on: September 03, 2019, 09:58:54 PM »
It is impossible the the fractional crowns circulated in the islands. It uses USD as its official currency. Source.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #39 on: September 03, 2019, 10:13:06 PM »
It is impossible the the fractional crowns circulated in the islands. It uses USD as its official currency. Source.

Peter

But the Turks and Caicos crown is equal in value to a US dollar (the currency officially used by the territory), therefore the quarter crown was equal in value to a US quarter.

Offline andyg

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #40 on: September 03, 2019, 11:53:32 PM »
Coins ? Turks and Caicos Museum

Quote
Today the official currency is the US dollar. However, there are still Turks and Caicos Islands coins in circulation. These can be obtained from the treasury or the Museum, and are still legal tender, but are generally purchased by tourists as souvenirs. On the reverse of the coins are a lobster, a windmill and the Turks and Caicos Islands’ crest (1 crown)

Souvenir coins are also issued. These often depict the monarchs head on one side and are issued to commemorate special events, such as the 500th anniversary of the rediscovery of the New World by Christopher Columbus and more recently for Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee in 2002.

The ¼ has a lobster, the ½ the windmill - are they suggesting the 1 Crown 1969 with the crest is also a circulation coin?  Note they distinguish between the circulation coins and the souvenir coins.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #41 on: September 03, 2019, 11:56:30 PM »
The ¼ has a lobster, the ½ the windmill - are they suggesting the 1 Crown 1969 with the crest is also a circulation coin?  Note they distinguish between the circulation coins and the souvenir coins.

I have never read that, but numista describes the 1969 and 1986 crown coins as 'standard circulation' - to my surprise. Our member Big_M says he has seen 1986 crown coins that look heavily circulated.

Offline Big_M

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #42 on: September 05, 2019, 01:39:28 PM »
Circulated T&C 1986 crown pictured. Most of these appearing on the market look similar, in fact UNC coins are very rarely offered and fetch high prices.

Offline <k>

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Re: Fractional units
« Reply #43 on: September 05, 2019, 03:28:36 PM »
Thank you, Big_M. So some collector coins do end up in circulation.