Author Topic: A question on some Otho Denari  (Read 183 times)

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Offline Overlord

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A question on some Otho Denari
« on: January 21, 2018, 09:52:06 AM »
I have a hunch that there is something wrong with these. However, apart from the last one, on which I see small pits that make me suspect if it is cast, I am unable to pinpoint anything (apart from a deposit on the surface: sand?) that might indicate a fake. Are there some obvious signs I am missing due to inexperience or am I just being paranoid?

Offline THCoins

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Re: A question on some Otho Denari
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2018, 09:33:58 PM »
You did not get much response on this post yet.
I think that may reflect my position in this matter. I think you are right that these coins look suspicious, but i do not consider myself an expert enough in this subject to give a reliable verdict.
Unfortunately to many reasonable quality imitations have surfaced the last decades. I do not trust myself enough anymore in the general sense. This is one of the reasons i slowly specialized in a number of niche subjects where coin prices are still cheap enough to be less interesting to counterfeiters.

Offline Overlord

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Re: A question on some Otho Denari
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2018, 03:44:31 AM »
You did not get much response on this post yet.
I think that may reflect my position in this matter. I think you are right that these coins look suspicious, but i do not consider myself an expert enough in this subject to give a reliable verdict.
Unfortunately to many reasonable quality imitations have surfaced the last decades. I do not trust myself enough anymore in the general sense. This is one of the reasons i slowly specialized in a number of niche subjects where coin prices are still cheap enough to be less interesting to counterfeiters.
Thank you, THCoins. I just wanted to ascertain if I was missing some obvious signs. The situation is indeed unfortunate for collectors. I guess seeing so many together (the inventory had a couple more, along with a Pertinax) was part of what made me suspicious. Better "framing" would have led to no suspicion on the individual pieces on my part!

Online Figleaf

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Re: A question on some Otho Denari
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 12:58:29 PM »
No flow marks, no cracks on the edge on any of them.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: A question on some Otho Denari
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2018, 01:50:32 PM »
No flow marks, no cracks on the edge on any of them.
Peter
Thanks Peter. I am not really sure how to spot the former. What does one look for?

Online Figleaf

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Re: A question on some Otho Denari
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2018, 01:58:57 PM »
"River" like lines from the centre to the edge. Look here for an example. In Roman coins, flow lines tend to be shorter. Flow lines are dug into a die by momentarily liquid metal seeking a way out during the strike. The older the die, the deeper the flow lines. "No flow lines" can be explained by "new die", but if none of the coins in a lot have them there's reason to be suspicious.

Edge cracks are due to cold flans. "No edge cracks" can be explained by "flan of proper temperature", but if none of the coins in a lot have edge cracks there's reason to be suspicious.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: A question on some Otho Denari
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2018, 02:05:30 PM »
"River" like lines from the centre to the edge. Look here for an example. In Roman coins, flow lines tend to be shorter. Flow lines are dug into a die by momentarily liquid metal seeking a way out during the strike. The older the die, the deeper the flow lines. "No flow lines" can be explained by "new die", but if none of the coins in a lot have them there's reason to be suspicious.

Edge cracks are due to cold flans. "No edge cracks" can be explained by "flan of proper temperature", but if none of the coins in a lot have edge cracks there's reason to be suspicious.

Peter
Very instructive! Thanks again.