Author Topic: Mintless  (Read 1012 times)

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Offline Overlord

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Mintless
« on: January 20, 2018, 05:50:31 PM »
Pedantic question: What do we mean when we say that a particular coin is "mintless"? That it was manufactured in a place that can be considered an official mint, or that it does not bear a mint name? I understand it to be the latter, in which case the term seems imprecise.

Offline Bimat

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Mintless
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2018, 06:00:47 PM »
Pedantic question: What do we mean when we say that a particular coin is "mintless"? That it was manufactured in a place that can be considered an official mint, or that it does not bear a mint name? I understand it to be the latter, in which case the term seems imprecise.

A coin without mint mark, so that you can't tell where it has been struck. ;)

Aditya
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mintless
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2018, 07:16:41 PM »
In modern terms, any ole place that makes round objects with a denomination can call itself a mint, so mintless must refer to not having a mintmark or not being a candy that tastes like cheap toothpaste. :)

Peter

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Offline Overlord

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Re: Mintless
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2018, 04:22:33 AM »
My (obviously pedantic) question was regarding the correctness of the term in this context. If the intended meaning is "not having a mint mark", why not say "without mintmark", rather than "mintless"?

Offline Pabitra

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Re: Mintless
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2018, 05:57:02 AM »
Not necessarily that every mint has to put a mint mark.
India has four mints and the oldest one (in Kolkata) does not put any mint mark.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mintless
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2018, 07:13:56 AM »
Fo the same reason that people call US cents pennies and tokens coins: sloppy speech, also known as "living language" ::)

My compatriots have a language of their own, commonly called Dutch. It is full of English words and expressions that by themselves may be badly understood, badly translated or bad English, some of it becoming good English by way of the "living language" argument. It's no use battling it. People will take you for a weirdo but say you are right.

The French have bureaucratised the problem by having a pompous official language authority, the Académie Française. It is happily ignored in other countries where French is spoken and its lists of official translations (link in french) - though sometimes quite clever - are routinely ridiculed or criticised.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Mintless
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2018, 02:17:23 PM »
I have never come across the term "mintless". I would use "no mintmark". In practice, I note mintmarks only when they constitute separate varieties (e.g. for German or Indian coins). For the US and exceptionally the UK, where "no mintmark" and "with mintmark X", where X = a variety of possible letters, I simply note the letter where the coin has one, and leave that field blank for Philadelphia issues with no P (i.e. cents) and Royal Mint issues.

I don't bother noting mintmarks where they occur identically on all coins in a series, such as Italy's R mintmark for Rome. In the 19th century, Italian coins were minted in other places as well as Rome, so it makes sense to note the R. But 20th century Italian (and San Marino and Vatican) coins *all* have the R mark.

Offline capnbirdseye

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Re: Mintless
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2018, 03:40:02 PM »
The term mintless occurs frequently throughout Gorons Indian Sultanates book where all the coins are hand struck so things such as minute dots etc as found on machine struck coins are not taken into account
Take for instance the Suri Paisa section where the coins with a written mint are listed first, this is followed by the mintless varieties but many of these do have an actual mintmark such as a star a swastika or a knot symbol but cannot accurately be attributed to any of the known mints.
Vic