Akbar: Silver Mehmudi ((½ Rupee), Mulher, KM #72.1....Swastika & sword mintmark

Started by mitresh, December 07, 2017, 05:32:54 AM

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mitresh

Akbar, Silver Mehmudi (½ Rupee), 5.58g, Mulher, KM #72.1

Coinage of the Chiefdoms or semi autonomous chieftains of Mughal India: Rajas of Baglana

Obv:inside double bordered dotted square: Kalima {لا اله الالله محمد رسول الله} (La Ilah il Illah Muhammad ur Rasul Allah)

Rev: جالال الدین محمد اکبر بادشاه غازی (Jalal ud din Muhammad Akbar Badshah Ghazi), Mint: Mulher {ملهر} (off flan), anti-clockwise Swastika in noon of Jalaluddin, sword above

Baglana was a small Rajput Kingdom in the trade route between Surat, Daulatabad and Golkonda, with Burhanpur nearby; basically located in the region of Malwa. Over a period of many centuries up until 1637, the kingdom had paid a tribute to various Muslim rulers. In that year, Shah Jahan, the Mughal Emperor, placed his young son Aurangzeb in command of a force that successfully and easily annexed the lands. The territory was put under the administrative control of a Mughal faujdar as a part of Khandesh province. The erstwhile Raja of Baglana did not long survive the conquest and his successor converted to Islam.

After its conquest by Akbar, the coinage of rupaiyas was introduced at the royal mints of Ahmedabad and sometime after of Surat. The coining of Mahmudis was continued by Pratap Sah at the fort of Mulher till 1637; his Mahmudis were struck in Akbar 's name. Five mahmudis made two rupees. Mehmudis in the name of Akbar are known to bear posthumous dates during the reign of Jahangir too.

South Asian coins and paper money catalogue of Krause publication (2013) cites that the Rajas of Baglana some how managed to rule upto 19th century and continued to issue posthumous coins in the name of Akbar where as Jos J. L. Gommans {Mughal Warfare: Indian frontiers and High roads to empie 1500-1700; Routledge, London (2012) p. 33} and J. F. Richards {The Mughal Empire: New Cambridge History of India, volume 5, CUP 1996, p. 128} had argued during the regime of Shah Jahan in 1637 , Baglana succumbed to the Mughal empire and became a part of Khandesh province.

Refer to the thread here for prior discussion on Mehmudis.
In the quest for Excellence, there's no finish line.

mitresh

Mehmudi dated AH 1026 with similar Swastika-sword mint marks (source: Rajgor Auctions 36, Lot 19, May 2015)
In the quest for Excellence, there's no finish line.

mitresh

2 more Mehmudis from my collection but without addl mint marks............

5.65g & 5.68g
In the quest for Excellence, there's no finish line.

Saikat

Hi,
Please allow me to join my half Mehmudi with similar sword and swastika mint mark.
Weight: 2.7 gm
Thanks,
Saikat

mitresh

In the quest for Excellence, there's no finish line.

Coinsforever

Nice mehmudis i may hunt now after reading and viewing your post guys.

However I sometime think these are not minted to standard of royal mints with respect to both silver fineness and weight.

Cheers ;D

Every experience, good or bad, is a priceless collector's item.



http://knowledge-numismatics.blogspot.in/

mitresh

Here's another one with sword-swastika......
In the quest for Excellence, there's no finish line.

hasan1182001

Dear Mr. Mitresh, could you please provide me a better quality photo of this coin?
Quote from: mitresh on December 07, 2017, 05:32:54 AMAkbar, Silver Mehmudi (½ Rupee), 5.58g, Mulher, KM #72.1

Coinage of the Chiefdoms or semi autonomous chieftains of Mughal India: Rajas of Baglana

Obv:inside double bordered dotted square: Kalima {لا اله الالله محمد رسول الله} (La Ilah il Illah Muhammad ur Rasul Allah)

Rev: جالال الدین محمد اکبر بادشاه غازی (Jalal ud din Muhammad Akbar Badshah Ghazi), Mint: Mulher {ملهر} (off flan), anti-clockwise Swastika in noon of Jalaluddin, sword above

Baglana was a small Rajput Kingdom in the trade route between Surat, Daulatabad and Golkonda, with Burhanpur nearby; basically located in the region of Malwa. Over a period of many centuries up until 1637, the kingdom had paid a tribute to various Muslim rulers. In that year, Shah Jahan, the Mughal Emperor, placed his young son Aurangzeb in command of a force that successfully and easily annexed the lands. The territory was put under the administrative control of a Mughal faujdar as a part of Khandesh province. The erstwhile Raja of Baglana did not long survive the conquest and his successor converted to Islam.

After its conquest by Akbar, the coinage of rupaiyas was introduced at the royal mints of Ahmedabad and sometime after of Surat. The coining of Mahmudis was continued by Pratap Sah at the fort of Mulher till 1637; his Mahmudis were struck in Akbar 's name. Five mahmudis made two rupees. Mehmudis in the name of Akbar are known to bear posthumous dates during the reign of Jahangir too.

South Asian coins and paper money catalogue of Krause publication (2013) cites that the Rajas of Baglana some how managed to rule upto 19th century and continued to issue posthumous coins in the name of Akbar where as Jos J. L. Gommans {Mughal Warfare: Indian frontiers and High roads to empie 1500-1700; Routledge, London (2012) p. 33} and J. F. Richards {The Mughal Empire: New Cambridge History of India, volume 5, CUP 1996, p. 128} had argued during the regime of Shah Jahan in 1637 , Baglana succumbed to the Mughal empire and became a part of Khandesh province.

Refer to the thread here for prior discussion on Mehmudis.


Figleaf

Sorry Hasan, Mitresh has gone largely passive. Pls consider contacting him by PM, explaining what you need a photo for, in order to specify the word "better".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

asm

I have a fairly large collection of Mehmudis and can help with pictures. Please mention the type of coin you are looking for - any specific mark etc.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"