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Author Topic: Pakistan: New Coin Commemorates Life of Dr. Pfau  (Read 104 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Pakistan: New Coin Commemorates Life of Dr. Pfau
« on: November 10, 2017, 03:51:47 PM »
Special Rs50 coins to commemorate the life of Pfau

Published: November 9, 2017

ISLAMABAD: The federal cabinet has approved a proposal to issue 50,000 pieces of commemorative 50-rupee coins in honour of the late humanitarian Dr Ruth Pfau.

The decision was taken during Wednesday’s cabinet meeting that was chaired by Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi.

[...]

Source: The Tribune
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Offline Bimat

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Pakistan: New Coin Commemorates Life of Dr. Pfau
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2017, 04:08:35 PM »
I have started liking the themes for Pakistani commemorative coins. First Abdul Sattar Edhi, now Dr. Ruth. So much better than commemorating insignificant events...

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Pakistan: New Coin Commemorates Life of Dr. Pfau
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2017, 05:33:59 PM »
I like your comment also. Indeed, the choice of a humanitarian for a coin is commendable. It's not just the work they do and their achievement, but also the example they give and the recognition that they have given up what could have been a perfectly comfortable life for the sake of helping total strangers. I note in passing that Albert Schweitzer figures only on pseudo coins...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Pakistan: New Coin Commemorates Life of Dr. Pfau
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2017, 04:28:18 AM »
A catholic nun getting commemorated on a Pakistani coin is significant. Christians doing charity is always seen with suspicion in this part of the world (because of conversions etc)...

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Pakistan: New Coin Commemorates Life of Dr. Pfau
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2017, 08:26:50 AM »
When it comes to selecting a subject for a commem, religion should be unimportant, as it was in your statement of appreciation, because you mentioned Abdul Sattar Edhi. It doesn't even matter that India started the trend with mother Theresa. What matters is their achievement: such people show that it is possible to do things differently and to have a positive impact on many lives. They are antidotes to hate and terrorism.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Pakistan: New Coin Commemorates Life of Dr. Pfau
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2017, 09:18:47 AM »
When it comes to selecting a subject for a commem, religion should be unimportant, as it was in your statement of appreciation, because you mentioned Abdul Sattar Edhi. It doesn't even matter that India started the trend with mother Theresa. What matters is their achievement: such people show that it is possible to do things differently and to have a positive impact on many lives. They are antidotes to hate and terrorism.

That's true, Peter. Since you mentioned Mother Teresa, here's a recent example of how extremists defame good work done by someone.

When Mother Teresa was canonized recently by the Pope, there was a well organized campaign against her in India, especially on social media. It was definitely not the first time that she was questioned, as there is some authentic proof available that she indeed carried out conversions. Even if so, I do not think that undermines her work, and such campaigns defaming anyone should be avoided. Doesn't happen so anywhere in the world...

I don't know if it's possible to carry out conversions in Pakistan as easily as in India, due to a very different cultural and political background...

Aditya
Caution. The low-hanging fruits are still there maybe for a reason.