Croatia: post-Yugoslav coinage

Started by <k>, October 24, 2017, 12:12:48 PM

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<k>

#15




Croatia 25 kuna 2002.jpg
 
In 2002 Croatia issued a special 25 kuna coin.

It commemorates the tenth anniversary of the country's international recognition.

A map of the country shows its unusual outline.
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<k>

#16
Degenia velebitica.jpg

Degenia velebitica.


From Wikipedia:

Degenia is a monotypic plant genus in the mustard family, containing the single species Degenia velebitica (Croatian: velebitska degenija). The yellow-flowered plant is endemic to the Velebit and Kapela mountain ranges in the Dinaric Alps, and has become a symbol of the region.
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<k>

#17
Croatia 50 lipa 2005.jpg

Here you see a 50 lipa coin of 2005, which shows the flower with its Croatian name.

The image is courtesy of coinz.eu.
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<k>

#18
Croatia set 2008-.jpg



Croatia set 2008.jpg

Here you see how the standard circulation coins of the set look together.
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<k>

#19
Croatia FAO set 1995.jpg


Here are the three denominations that were issued as commemorative coins in 1995. They celebrate the 50th anniversary of FAO - the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The motto "FIAT PANIS" is Latin for "Let there be bread".

From left to right; 1 lipa; 20 lipa; 2 kune.  The 1 lipa is an aluminium coin, so it does not look as good as the other two.
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Globetrotter

I have this coin!!! The bear got a kick in it's nose, I would say?

Ole

<k>

Yes, that bear doesn't look particularly realistic, as bears go.
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natko

Ole, hope you won't mind if I put your image of that known bear with extra metal on the nose. Year is 2007.



There are sometimes such die breaks, on smaller coins, especially the steel ones which are hardest, I've found extra leaves, no stems or even filled letters, but lost interest in minting errors long ago. I believe the extra nose along with other differences is also just a worn out die, although of course, nice to notice. Today is rare to have different dies that are not identical, when they're made at the same mint.

natko

#23
I've noticed the commemorative series of 1994-1996 are not included. Regular coins showing flora and fauna are also fine, I don't think they're not realistic and can't think of many countries having animals and plants in that quality depicted, but by far my favorite design of all Croatian is a commemorative of 5 kuna. It commemorates 500 years of opening a monastery printer in Senj, where in 1494. a liturgical book was printed in glagolitic script. Everything else doesn't come even close. Sculptor is Damir Matausic.

A million of these were minted for circulation, however 300 pcs were made out of gold and I can assume it is the most valuable regular issue of Croatia nowadays. Too bad I couldn't afford it when it was issued, never seen it offered after it sold out.



5kn1994Au.jpg

Image from the artist's picassa

<k>

Quote from: natko on November 27, 2017, 04:36:37 PM
I've noticed the commemorative series of 1994-1996 are not included.

I wanted to concentrate on the regular circulation coins, so I only included one or two commemoratives.

Quote from: natko on November 27, 2017, 04:36:37 PM
Regular coins showing flora and fauna are also fine, I don't think they're not realistic

I meant only that the face of the bear was not realistic. Its body and proportions are perfect, of course, as are all the other designs. I bought a set of the first coins without seeing them first, because I was surprised to see them listed in my favourite dealer's mailing, and I was thrilled when they arrived and I actually saw them. I didn't have the internet in those days, of course. It is a beautiful set, and I love the marten on the obverse of the kuna coins.
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<k>

#26


Dot after the year.






No dot after the year?





Dot after the year: "1945."  "1995."


I notice that most Croatian coins show a dot after the year.

By dot I mean period, or 'full stop'.

Is that feature part of standard Croatian orthography?
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Figleaf

I suspect that the dot is indeed grammatical. Look at the Croatian word medvjed (bear) on the penultimate picture. The Russian equivalent, медведь is pronounced exactly the same way. Obviously, Russian has an influence on Croatian. BTW, mrki is темнота - no relation.

In Russian, a date (year) is followed by the word "year", so 2023 is 2023год or 2023г. Some czarist coins are dated this way. Perhaps the Croatian dot has the same function as the Russian г?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

natko

It's really very simple.

In Croatian language years are ordinal numbers. Because we say in speech "two thousand and twenty third (year)" or simply "twenty third". Ordinal numbers are written in Croatian with a dot. E.g. "3rd" will be written simply - "3.".

So it is grammatical indeed but it's not an abbreviation. In Russian год means year and similarly in Croatian is godina. We can sometimes write 2023. g., in a more formal writing.

Back to coins, yes, 1993 doesn't have a dot, all of the others do have it. It was considered incorrect, although the idea of the artist was to show years more symmetrically.

<k>

Quote from: natko on February 15, 2023, 08:42:25 PMIn Croatian language years are ordinal numbers. Because we say in speech "two thousand and twenty third (year)" or simply "twenty third". Ordinal numbers are written in Croatian with a dot. E.g. "3rd" will be written simply - "3.".

I see. That's like the way that the Germans write days of the month: "15. Februar" means 15th February. But they do not do the same with years.

QuoteBack to coins, yes, 1993 doesn't have a dot, all of the others do have it. It was considered incorrect, although the idea of the artist was to show years more symmetrically.

So it was indeed an anomaly. But I assume that the coin is not rare.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.