News:

Sign up for the monthly zoom events by sending a PM with your email address to Hitesh

Main Menu

Circulation sets with duplicate pictorial designs

Started by <k>, October 22, 2017, 01:12:38 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

Normally you would expect a circulation set with different pictorial designs to have a different design for each denomination, but that is not always the case. This would indicate a lack of imagination or even laziness on the part of the designers.

In this topic I will also include designs that are very similar or contain some of the same elements.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1


South Africa, halfpenny.





South Africa, penny.


Superb design, but why twice?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2


South Africa, 3d.





South Africa, 6d.


The two coins used a very similar design, but with a different number of surrounding faggots.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#3


South Africa, florin.





South Africa, 2½ shillings.


The coat of arms, followed by the crowned coat of arms.  Laziness?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#4


South Africa, ½ cent, 1970 and later.





South Africa, 1 cent, 1965 to 1989.


The ½ cent coin of this set was not issued until 1970.

Why was the sparrows design reused on that coin?

Probably to maintain the tradition that the sparrows always appeared on South Africa's lowest denomination.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#5


Australia, halfpenny.





Australia, penny.


The design on the penny was of the same kangaroo, but reversed.

A koala design was considered for the halfpenny but not used.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Malawi, six pence.





Malawi, 1 tambala.





Malawi, 1 kwacha.


The kwacha design was added while the 1 tambala coin was still in circulation.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>



Bahrain. The 5 and 10 fils both feature a stylised palm tree. Surely a different design could have been found for one of them?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#8







British West Africa - 1 and 2 shillings - palm trees.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#9
Peru un sol de oro.jpg


Peru half sol de oro 1966-.jpg

Peru, ½ and 1 sol de oro.  Vicuña.


I have the brass versions. Apparently they also come in silver and silver-plated versions.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

andyg

#10
NC.jpg

New Caledonia.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

andyg

always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

andyg

The answer is that the four aluminium coins were first issued in 1952, the rest came later.  But that doesn't explain why the 100 Francs reused the 50 Franc design :-\
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

onecenter

Some of these designs are considered classics for the country-of-issue.  One design not mentioned in this discussion is the French Republic issues of Hercules, a venerable design classic first issued in 1795 and many, many times since. :)
Mark

chrisild

Admittedly I do not have any problems with the same design being used for several denominations. But maybe for a German that is part of the DNA. ;D  Our 1, 2, 5 and 10 pfennig coins (Federal Republic) basically had the very same design. And these days, since there are eight denominations but three (somewhat) different common sides, it made some sense to also use three different obverse designs ...

Christian