Author Topic: The decimal coinage of Australia  (Read 2075 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2017, 09:47:14 AM »


Eventually a 12-sided copper-nickel coin was chosen, with a diameter of 31.5 mm. It remains one of the world's largest and heaviest circulation coins.

See also: The coat of arms on Australian coins.

 
« Last Edit: October 22, 2017, 10:16:16 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2017, 09:59:49 AM »
This was a beautiful set, depicting Australia's unique animals. The echidna and the platypus are monotremes, whilst the kangaroo and feather-tailed glider are marsupials.

See also:

1] Kangaroos on Coins.

2] Monotremes on coins.

3] Other marsupials on coins.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2017, 10:07:01 AM »

Wombat.




Penguin.




Kangaroos.



By the mid-1980s, the authorities had decided that a dollar coin was also necessary. Stuart Devlin was once more recruited to provide a design for the coin. Above you can see some of his initial ideas.

 
« Last Edit: October 31, 2018, 12:03:24 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2017, 10:10:12 AM »




The first circulation dollar was issued in 1984. It featured Devlin's design of five leaping kangaroos.

The coin was 25 mm in diameter and weighed 9 grams. It was made of 92% copper, 6% aluminium and 2% nickel.

 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2018, 12:06:11 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2017, 10:17:41 AM »
In 1985 the UK adopted a new portrait of the Queen, by Raphael Maklouf, and Australia did likewise.

See also: Raphael Maklouf did not design the third portrait of Queen Elizabeth II.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2017, 10:30:53 AM »




In 1988 Australia introduced a 2 dollar coin. It portrayed an aboriginal elder out in the bush.

The reverse design was the work of Horst Hahne.

The coin was 20.5 mm in diameter and weighed 6.6 grams. It was therefore smaller than the 1 dollar coin, but it was made of the same alloy.

 
« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 04:42:15 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2017, 10:33:52 AM »




In 1988 Australia minted some special coins to commemorate the country's bicentennial.

They included a dollar depicting a kangaroo in the style of aboriginal art.

 
« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 10:43:28 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2017, 10:35:30 AM »


Australia Bicentennial, 50 cents, 1988.  HMS Endeavour.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2017, 02:42:59 PM »
In a Budget Speech on 21 August 1990, the Australian Treasurer announced the decision to demonetise the 1 and 2 cent coins. This was due to inflation reducing their value and the high cost of bronze. Both coins were demonetised and were no longer legal tender from 1 February 1992 onward.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2017, 02:43:33 PM »
In 1998 the UK adopted a new effigy of the Queen, created by Ian Rank-Broadley. Australia did likewise in 1999.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #25 on: October 17, 2017, 02:44:35 PM »
That concludes my survey of Australia's decimal coinage. No doubt I have omitted many interesting developments, so you may wish to add your own comments.

In the meantime, the Australian coinage leaves some things to be desired - in my opinion. See:

Improving the specifications of the Australian coinage.



See also:

1] Predecimal coinage of the Commonwealth of Australia.

2] The coat of arms on Australian coins.

 
« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 04:34:49 PM by <k> »

Offline malj1

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2017, 12:35:11 PM »
Re the mention of our confusion between the 50 and 20 cents. see this Re: Advertising stickers where a difference of 4mm also led to confusion in the Netherlands.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline <k>

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2017, 12:45:11 PM »
Really! What is wrong with these people?  ::)

Offline malj1

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #28 on: October 22, 2017, 05:18:26 AM »
The two dollar coin in Reply #20 in addition to the aborigine figure included the grass tree, Xanthorrhoea, common names for this included the blackboy which some people felt could be a reference to the aborigine elder and not politically correct but this surprisingly was never really commented upon to any extent.
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

Offline Alan71

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Re: The decimal coinage of Australia
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2017, 10:58:39 PM »
Unlike the 5, 10 and 20 cents coins, the 50 cents was not copper-nickel but silver. However, it was discovered that the Australians often mistook the 50 cents for a 20 cents coin, which was 3 mm narrower in diameter. As a result, trials were performed to find a more satisfactory coin.

As you can see here, the Royal Australian Mint considered 7-sided, 12-sided and 16-sided versions of the coin.
It’s interesting that a seven-sided coin was considered.  The 12-sided coin was apparently introduced in 1969, the same year as the UK’s 50p coin.  Had they gone with the seven-sided version, they could have possibly beaten the UK to it (as the UK 50p wasn’t issued until mid-October 1969).  The 50p would have been relegated to the world’s second curved heptagonal coin.