Author Topic: The portrayal of animals in coin design  (Read 12308 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: The portrayal of animals in coin design
« Reply #30 on: February 03, 2017, 04:49:25 PM »
I wonder why the two examples chosen are both from English speaking countries.

Possibly because the people choosing them were best acquainted with the coins of those countries. Nevertheless, they are still both "Wow!" sets that have been admired by non-English-speakers. Here is another "Wow!" set from a non-Anglophone country:

Norwegian wildlife series, 1958 to 1973

However, I would contend that was heavily influenced by Metcalfe's Irish set, so it doesn't quite have the "Wow!" of originality.

And your example is an individual coin and not part of a set.



So, what would be another "Wow!" set from a non-Anglophone or even non-Commonwealth country? I'm very fond of the Indonesian bird designs, of the 1970s onwards, which are very stylish, but they were produced piecemeal, a year here, a year there, so they lost a bit of coherence thereby.



See: Indonesia, Birds, and Wallace's Line.

 
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 05:40:14 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The portrayal of animals in coin design
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2017, 05:48:59 PM »


Australian penny.





Australian half penny.

NOTE:  The images above are not to scale: the half penny was not larger than the penny.

See: Predecimal coinage of the Commonwealth of Australia.



When I first saw the Australian predecimal set, I loved the kangaroo on the penny and half penny, and I still do. However, I was disappointed that the same basic design was used on those two designs. Over time, I remembered the penny design as being simply a mirror image of the half penny, apart from the denomination. However, that is not true: the placement of the year, the commonwealth star and the designer's initials are completely different; also, on the penny the kangaroo's paws come much closer to the rim of the coin.

Offline <k>

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Re: The portrayal of animals in coin design
« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2017, 05:53:46 PM »
















As you can see, a lot of thought (and second thoughts) went into the placement of the various elements of the designs.

See: Australia: Rejected pre-decimal designs of 1937/8.

Offline <k>

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Re: The portrayal of animals in coin design
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2017, 05:55:50 PM »


Malawi, six pence, 1964.





Malawi, 1 tambala, 1971.





Malawi, 1 kwacha, 1992.



Above you see the journey of Malawi's cockerel across different denominations, from low to high.

Do you know of any other animal designs that were reversed?

 
« Last Edit: June 08, 2019, 04:47:40 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The portrayal of animals in coin design
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2017, 06:08:20 PM »
Yes, I remember now! When the Irish reduced the size of their 5 pence and 10 pence coins in the 1990s, they also took the opportunity to reverse the designs, so that the animals on all the coins (20 pence and 50 pence included) all faced the same way. Why this petty neatness was thought necessary, I do not know, but it was interesting for collectors.

In fact, the elements of the design have not simply been reversed on the 5 pence.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 02:36:03 AM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: The portrayal of animals in coin design
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2017, 06:09:43 PM »
Now let's look at the Irish 10 pence variations. Strangely, the later coin is beaded, and the "10P" has been moved higher. Can you spot any other changes? I'm thinking specifically of eagle-eyed forum member Alan71 as I write.  :)