Author Topic: Gambia's predecimal to decimal design transition  (Read 1455 times)

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Offline Big_M

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Re: Gambia's predecimal to decimal design transition
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2018, 05:13:28 PM »
The coins were somewhat smaller than their UK counterparts. Additionally, the UK never had a round brass threepence - though I believe Jersey did. Check out the specs:

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/gambie-1.html

Apparently the Queen was included simply as head of the Commonwealth. How many people in the world do not know who "The Queen" is?

The Queen in 1966 was also the Queeen of the Gambia. Dawda Jawara became the head of state as President in April 1970 only.

Offline <k>

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Re: Gambia's predecimal to decimal design transition
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2018, 05:18:13 PM »
You are right. I have deleted that statement.

Offline <k>

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Re: Gambia's predecimal to decimal design transition
« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2018, 07:49:17 PM »
Re-reading my old notes, as part of a tidying up exercise at home, I discovered that the Gambian authorities asked for the Queen to be portrayed on the obverse of the 1966 coins, but with the simple legend of Gambia. This was because at the time that the coins were being planned, during 1965, Gambia was also planning a referendum, to decide whether the country should become a republic: Gambian republic referendum, 1965. Then, whatever happened, the Queen could be regarded either as the head of state or the head of the Commonwealth, and her portrait would still be legitimate until the situation changed.



From Wikipedia:

A referendum on becoming a republic was held in the Gambia on 24 November 1965. If the referendum had passed, the post of president would have replaced Elizabeth II as head of state, and thus eliminated the post of Governor-General.

There were 154,626 registered voters for the referendum, with 93,484 valid votes cast. 65.85% of voters voted for the proposal, but failed to reach the two-thirds support required for the proposal to be accepted.

A second referendum was held in 1970, which resulted in a successful "yes" vote. Prime Minister Dawda Jawara was elected president by the parliament, replacing Elizabeth II (represented by Farimang Mamadi Singateh) as head of state on 24 April 1970.