Author Topic: Hermanubis Collection  (Read 309 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Hermanubis Collection
« on: October 12, 2017, 11:44:54 PM »
There were a few (CNG) auctions in the last two years containing coins from the Hermanubis Collection. Does anybody know more about this? It contains (as far as I know) Roman-Greek tetradrachms minted in Alexandria. I think I only saw coins from the second and third century, but maybe I didn't find all the auctions. I don't suppose so - but is there a catalog of all the coins in this collection?

What I saw of it, were coins in fine style and very good condition, much better than what you see most. This is a good example of a coin I would have liked very much: Maximinus I (235-238) with Helios on the reverse, both in an excellent artistic style and in the best condition you could hope for, in such a coin.
In August, the prices were sky high, now in October a bit less so. When was this collection assembled, is it long ago? Does anybody know?
-- Paul

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Hermanubis Collection
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2017, 03:44:38 PM »
Hermanubis is a nickname, derived from Hermes and Anubis. On coins, Hermanubis is depicted as a human (Anubis has a jackal's head), but with the attribute jackal. I presume there is a human behind the collection who doesn't want his name mentioned in a place it can be found by the US tax authorities. >:D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Hermanubis Collection
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2017, 04:16:59 PM »
Well, here is Hermanubis himself on one of his own coins (= a Hermanubis tetradrachm from the Hermanubis collection), nice portraits I find. Until recently, I avoided coins of the emperor Maximinus, because he was a brute and the first, and one of the most reprehensible, of the 'Soldier Emperors', 235-284.
-- Paul


« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 08:41:40 AM by Pellinore »