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Author Topic: Tiny Alexander AE  (Read 154 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Tiny Alexander AE
« on: October 05, 2017, 12:59:20 AM »
This little coin was in my father-in-law's collection, he bought it in the 1970s for the price one would pay for an LP in those days.
AE Macedonia, Alexander the Great. Obv. Lion-scalp crowned head of Heracles r. Rev. Bow and club. ALEXA-NDROU. 13 mm, 1.95 gr. Yellowish. And yes, it's a yellow bronze coin of a light weight. How would you call it? A chalkous? 1/8 obol, says my dictionary. It was not easy to picture, hence two small photos.
-- Paul


Offline Figleaf

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2017, 08:55:25 AM »
 :like: A well conserved workhorse with all the Alexandrian symbols. If Alexander would have been rational, he would have stopped after taking Egypt. It was a rich prize, especially for small Macedonia. However, it was taking the impossible, idiotic risk of invading the Achaemid empire that gave him the nickname "great". Does it take madness to become great?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2017, 09:24:01 AM »
Thanks! I just never realized they were using yellow copper in the 4th cent. BC. Well conserved workhorse, that's what I like.
-- Paul

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2017, 12:52:03 AM »
Can you call this yellow metal brass? I thought brass was only used starting from the first century BC.
-- Paul

Offline Arminius

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2017, 07:12:17 PM »
Can you call this yellow metal brass? I thought brass was only used starting from the first century BC.
-- Paul

Maybe lead caused the yellow color. So you may call it leaded bronze.

A qualified metal analysis will stop speculation.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2017, 08:25:56 PM »
Well, if you want a molecule, you can have it. But I don't want to sacrifice this 'well conserved workhorse'.
-- Paul

Offline Arminius

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2017, 11:03:05 PM »
Well, if you want a molecule, you can have it. But I don't want to sacrifice this 'well conserved workhorse'.
-- Paul

Modern analytical techniques for metal alloys dont need or consume any material - only a clean surface.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2017, 11:47:20 PM »
Excellent! Im willing to send it to anyone who can test it, as long as I will get it back.
Paul

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2017, 10:59:33 PM »
I would call ir orichalcum. See here, copper-zinc in modern terms.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Tiny Alexander AE
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2017, 12:08:11 AM »
That Wikipedia article is an interesting read. It suggests that coins like my little workhorse were considered more valuable than dark bronze.
Paul