Poll

Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?

5 pounds - George Stephenson
0 (0%)
10 pounds - Charles Dickens
1 (25%)
20 pounds - Michael Faraday
2 (50%)
50 pounds - Sir John Houblon
0 (0%)
I like them all equally
0 (0%)
I don't like any of them
1 (25%)
Don't know
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 4

Voting closed: October 08, 2017, 06:25:46 PM

Author Topic: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?  (Read 518 times)

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Offline <k>

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Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« on: September 30, 2017, 06:25:46 PM »
The Bank of England's Series E banknotes were first issued from 1990 to 1994. Some different reverse portraits were issued in the early 21st century, and these were called "revisions" of Series E. So I am not certain what a series is, in the terms of the Bank of England. Can anybody help me out? This series does not includes a 1 pound note, since it was replaced by a one pound coin in 1983.

The images are copyright of Pam West, who is an established and respected dealer of banknotes.
See the relevant page from her web site here.

So, which is your favourite reverse?

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2017, 06:28:47 PM »
I've gone for the 20 pound reverse. It's more sophisticated in style than the others, I think. I still like the fiver and tenner, though the human figure at bottom left on the 50 pound note looks too intrusive. Nor is Sir John Houblon (as portrayed) particularly interesting in terms of his looks. Not as strong a set as Series D, but still there are some fine designs.

Offline Alan71

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2017, 10:05:37 AM »
Again not much in it but I went for the £10.

Are you doing the E (Variant) series and F/G, <k>?  F and G may as well be taken as one series for now.

Series E had a few teething problems as the denominations weren’t too clear.  Most of the photos shown are the amended ones but I think the £5 is the original version.  There is no denomination top right and even the one top left isn’t that clear.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2017, 10:12:50 AM »
Are you doing the E (Variant) series ?

I knew you were going to say that, so I did it even as you were thinking it. Where is my Nobel Prize for Telepathy?  >:(

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2017, 10:14:36 AM »
Yes, I think most of the denominations in other sets too ended up with variations, even sometimes just of colour.

So what determines a series? It's not clear to me. Maybe you'd like to add the obverses.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2017, 10:32:24 AM »
Apparently Roger Withington designed this series. Series D was designed by Harry Eccleston - sometimes spelled Ecclestone - I don't know which was the correct spelling.

Offline Alan71

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2017, 11:09:40 AM »
So what determines a series? It's not clear to me.
It looks like Wikipedia’s pages on Bank of England notes are sourced from the Bank of England website.
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/Pages/current/default.aspx
On this page, series E (Variant), F and G are mentioned.  I’ve also seen “Variant” given as “Revision” on other sites.

I’m no expert on this but it looks like a series is determined as a set of notes that are significantly different to the previous versions, and require these previous notes to be withdrawn after a co-circulation period.  E (Variant) did require the withdrawal of E after such a period, and depicted a new set of historical figures, but in some respects wasn’t that much different.  This therefore meant it didn’t warrant a new letter.

Series F was different enough from E and E (Variant) to be classed as a separate series.  However, the use of the same portrait of the Queen across the last four series means changes are not as obvious as they were when D changed to E.

F has only been used on the £20 and £50 as it has been superseded by G.  G isn’t all that much different and keeps much of the design of F, but the polymer format means it has to be classed as a separate series.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2017, 11:14:43 AM »
it looks like a series is determined as a set of notes that are significantly different to the previous versions, and require these previous notes to be withdrawn after a co-circulation period.  E (Variant) did require the withdrawal of E after such a period, and depicted a new set of historical figures, but in some respects wasn’t that much different.  This therefore meant it didn’t warrant a new letter.

Difficult one. How would you define "significant" in this case? E (Variant) wasn’t that much different from E in some respects, you say - but in which respects? Can you define it a little more closely?

Offline Alan71

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2017, 11:35:38 AM »
Difficult one. How would you define "significant" in this case? E (Variant) wasn’t that much different from E in some respects, you say - but in which respects? Can you define it a little more closely?
I must admit I’m starting to agree with you.  To me there are enough differences for it to count as a separate series.

E


E (Variant)




G



Offline Alan71

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2017, 11:45:39 AM »
The oval in the middle of both “E” versions is one similarity.  The “Five Pounds” on both sides is depicted in the same font on each version, as is “Bank of England”. 

On both reverse sides (and indeed, the obverse sides) there is a coloured “margin” on the left, onto which the main artwork is inset.  The background changes colour on both sides of both versions above the word “England”, going off to a diagonal.

With Series G (and F, for which there was no £5), none of these similarities are apparent, although “Bank of England” on the Queen’s side is rendered similarly (but not the same).

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2017, 11:47:06 AM »
Series F has only the £20 and £50 notes. I never handled a £50 note of that series.

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2017, 11:54:12 AM »
This is getting complicated. I'll have to let you do the F and G polls.  Are you game?

Offline Alan71

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2017, 11:55:44 AM »
It’s also possible that, because E (Variant) started appearing just nine years after E first appeared, it was felt that a new portrait of the Queen wasn’t necessary.  Perhaps the Bank at the time had decided a new portrait meant a new series, so E (Variant) couldn’t be classed as one.  Perhaps they intended Series F to have a new portrait and possibly the Palace refused?  And they were then stuck with a series within a series?

Offline <k>

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Re: Which is your favourite UK series E banknote ?
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2017, 11:57:26 AM »
Perhaps somebody should ask the Bank of England or some expert person what the logic was behind this. I'm not cued up on banknotes, so I'm not the best person to do it.