Author Topic: Mountains and volcanoes on coins  (Read 30055 times)

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Offline FosseWay

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #195 on: February 17, 2021, 10:38:01 AM »
Carlos III Naples and Sicily Piaster 120 Granos 1735.
It shows a River god with two mountains behind. I assume the volcano, right with the smoke emanating, is the Vesuvius. The mountain on the left is Monte Somma.

Yes, that's definitely Vesuvius. It is shown erupting, which is a fair representation given the age of the coin. In 1631 it erupted in what is probably the largest eruption since the famous one of AD 79. It then erupted very frequently for 300 years, but mostly with relatively small eruptions. Seeing the volcano with a plume of ejecta would therefore not have been unusual in 1735 when your coin was made. Then the eruptions stopped again after the 1944 event. There hasn't been such a long gap between eruptions as now since before 1631, and the risk is that the longer the interval before the next one, the bigger it will be. There was a scare in 1996 (when I was living in Naples so saw it first hand) when wind whipped up sand from the crater and made it look from a distance as if there was smoke rising from it. The normally chaotic traffic in Naples became apocalyptically impossible.

Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #196 on: February 18, 2021, 11:43:09 AM »
Yes, that's definitely Vesuvius. It is shown erupting, which is a fair representation given the age of the coin. In 1631 it erupted in what is probably the largest eruption since the famous one of AD 79. It then erupted very frequently for 300 years, but mostly with relatively small eruptions. Seeing the volcano with a plume of ejecta would therefore not have been unusual in 1735 when your coin was made. Then the eruptions stopped again after the 1944 event. There hasn't been such a long gap between eruptions as now since before 1631, and the risk is that the longer the interval before the next one, the bigger it will be. There was a scare in 1996 (when I was living in Naples so saw it first hand) when wind whipped up sand from the crater and made it look from a distance as if there was smoke rising from it. The normally chaotic traffic in Naples became apocalyptically impossible.

Not only does this Italian coin exist about Vesuvius. Of this same issue is the 60 Grani coin, very similar in all respects only changes the weight in half, obviously.Later Ferdinand IV of Naples, Charles VII of Bourbon´s son, issued two more coins. The first was issued in 1772, coinciding with the birth of his firstborn, in it you can see his wife and daughter and in the background the Sebeto River and Mount Vesuvius, note the great influence of his wife that manages to appear on both sides of the coin. The second coin was issued in 1791 and is an allegorical figure of the Sebeto river and Parthenopia making sacrifice on altar. Mount Vesuvius in distance.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #197 on: February 18, 2021, 12:55:48 PM »
I am confused. The piece Henk shows in reply #184 is clearly a coin. Its denomination is below the shield. If I assume that your 60 grani piece has the same reverse, but with a different denomination, that is a coin also. The top two illustrations marked 120 grani seem to belong together. I cannot find a denomination and the piece has the characteristics of a history medal (fine detail, personification of the queen as fertility etc.) The third illustration marked 120 grani is missing the obverse, but from what I can see, it looks more like a medal than like a coin also.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #198 on: February 19, 2021, 09:23:46 AM »
I am confused. The piece Henk shows in reply #184 is clearly a coin. Its denomination is below the shield. If I assume that your 60 grani piece has the same reverse, but with a different denomination, that is a coin also. The top two illustrations marked 120 grani seem to belong together. I cannot find a denomination and the piece has the characteristics of a history medal (fine detail, personification of the queen as fertility etc.) The third illustration marked 120 grani is missing the obverse, but from what I can see, it looks more like a medal than like a coin also.

Peter

Yes Peter, 60 grani coin has the same reverse as the 120 grani. In relation to the "Fecvnditas" coin (KM#184) and the "Return of King and Queen from Austria" coin (KM#212), they don't have the denomination, it's true, but they have the same diameter and same composition as the 120 grani circulation coins from the period of the kingdom of Naples. I have search for it in several catalogs and in all of them they appear as commemorative coins, not as medals.

Javier

Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #199 on: February 22, 2021, 12:14:06 PM »
China, 1 Yuan, 1988.

Coin issued for the 30th anniversary of the Kwangsi Autonomous Region, that region is covered in carbonate rocks which are easily chemically eroded by water, forming one of the world’s most spectacular examples of humid tropical to subtropical karst landscapes. This morphology is well developed including tower karst, pinnacle karst and cone karst formations, along with other spectacular characteristics such as natural bridges, gorges and large cave systems.

Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #200 on: February 23, 2021, 09:43:37 AM »
USA, 25 Cent (America the Beautiful Quarters), 2012.

Puu Oo is a volcanic cone in the eastern rift zone of the Kīlauea volcano of the Hawaiian Islands. Kīlauea is a shield volcano, the most recent and active of the five that make up the island of Hawaii. It is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. The oldest underwater lava flows have been dated to about 300,000 years ago, emerging over the sea about 70,000 years ago. Lava flows in Hawaii have a basic chemical composition giving a very fluid lava that can create lava rivers of a few miles.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 10:20:15 AM by Javier »

Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #201 on: February 24, 2021, 10:16:03 AM »
Nicaragua, 1 Córdoba, 1972

This Nicaraguan coin has five volcanoes that represent the states of the former Federal Republic of Central America (1824-1840): Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. In Nicaragua the highest volcano is the San Cristóbal Volcano at 1,745 m. Located in the northwest of the country. It is also among the most active volcanoes in Nicaragua.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #202 on: February 24, 2021, 11:23:08 AM »
 :applause: :applause:
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #203 on: February 25, 2021, 09:46:19 AM »
USA, 25 CENT (50 State Quarters), 2006.

Chimney Rock is a prominent natural geologic formation located in the state of Nebraska. Rising about 91 meters above the surrounding North Platte River valley. Chimney Rock consists mainly of Brule clay intercalated with volcanic ash and Arikaree sandstone. The harder sandstone layers near the top have protected the pillar which was separated from the rest of the mesa to the south making a outlier.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #204 on: February 25, 2021, 02:45:09 PM »
This beautiful peak is a miracle of nature.
Is your coin gold plated or is the photograph distorting the colors?
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #205 on: February 25, 2021, 03:35:46 PM »
This beautiful peak is a miracle of nature.
Is your coin gold plated or is the photograph distorting the colors?

No, it is not. It's just color distortion, I have the circulating commemorative (Copper-Nickel coated copper), maybe that's why the distortion is silver to gold ... I do not know ... as far as I know there are just two edition, circulating commemorative and the silver edition.
Although there is an uncirculated cuproniquel Nebraska quarter from Denver Mint that has 7 layers of pure 24 karat gold.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #206 on: February 25, 2021, 03:55:27 PM »
Thank. The photo is very high quality.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline WillieBoyd2

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #207 on: February 25, 2021, 04:55:02 PM »
A coin not with image of volcano but encased in volcanic lava:

One doesn't see this every day, an Italian coin embedded in a piece of volcanic lava.

These items have been manufactured by Italian entrepreneurs since the early 1900's for sale to tourists.

Most of them come from the Mt. Vesuvius volcano region near Naples which last erupted in 1944.

The lava coin pictured here may have been brought to America by a returning serviceman.


Italian coin pressed into a piece of lava

A longer post under Coins of Italy, Malta, Cyprus and modern Greece:
Lava Coin Italy Vesuvius Volcano Eruption 1944 encased coin of 1919
http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,50572.0.html

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Offline Javier

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #208 on: February 26, 2021, 09:09:22 AM »
Zimbabwe, 50 Cent, 2001.

The Matobo or Matopos National Park is located about 35 kilometers south of Bulawayo, in Zimbabwe. There we can find Tors (like the one in the coin) which is a type of block inselberg, whose morphology is controlled by the fracturing systems with spheroidal weathering of the squared blocks. They is rarely more than 15 meters high and appear mainly in granite rock, as is the case of the Matopos Batholith.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #209 on: February 26, 2021, 11:49:44 AM »
Awesome. I can imagine fracturing producing flat areas, but am at a loss to imagine fracturing producing blocks!

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.