Author Topic: Mountains and volcanoes on coins  (Read 26906 times)

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Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #45 on: January 20, 2015, 05:05:06 PM »
Nepal, 50 rupee, 2011.
Machhapuchhre ("Fish Tail" in English), 6993 m is a mountain in of north central Nepal. It is revered by the local population as particularly sacred to the god Shiva, and hence is off limits to climbing. Machhapuchhre It is also nicknamed the "Matterhorn of Nepal".
Machhapuchchhre has never been climbed to its summit. The only attempt was in 1957 by a British team led by Jimmy Roberts. Climbers W. Noyce and A. Cox climbed to within 150 m of the summit via the north ridge, but did not complete the ascent; they had promised not to set foot on the actual summit. Since then, the mountain has been declared sacred, and it is now closed to climbers.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #46 on: February 22, 2015, 09:25:15 PM »
Japan, 500 Yen, 2014.
Kagawa, Mt. Iino (421.9 m), known to the locals as Sannuki-Fuji, is a dormant conical volcano with commanding panoramic views. The ease of access and variety of paths make it a popular outing for both locals and tourists alike.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 09:17:58 AM by Gusev »
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline <k>

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #47 on: March 30, 2015, 07:21:59 PM »
New Zealand, 1 dollar, 1970.

Mount Aorangi, also known as Mount Cook.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #48 on: July 28, 2015, 07:01:45 PM »
Switzerland, 5 fr., 1851.
Mount Pilatus is a mountain overlooking Lucerne in Central Switzerland. It is composed of several summits of which the highest (2,128 m) is named Tomlishorn. Another summit named Esel (2,119 m) lies just over the railway station. Jurisdiction over the massif is divided between the cantons of Obwalden, Nidwalden, and Lucerne. The main peaks are right on the border between Obwalden and Nidwalden. In this area originates Old Swiss Confederacy.

Numbered amongst those who have reached its summit are Conrad Gessner, Theodore Roosevelt, Arthur Schopenhauer (1804), Queen Victoria and Julia Ward Howe (1867).
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #49 on: January 01, 2016, 01:43:30 PM »
São Tomé and Príncipe, 100 dobras, 1997.
Peak Grande, 663 m.
It looks like a obscene gesture. :o
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #50 on: January 05, 2016, 06:14:23 PM »
Few people know, that the first conquest of Everest coincided with the coronation of Elizabeth II.

At 11 am, the 29th May 1953 the New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Norgay Tentsig stood on top of the mountain height of 8848 meters, the highest point on Earth. It was a great victory.
It was necessary to send a message to the UK before the coronation was 3 days. But if you do it on the radio, it would have violated the exclusive rights to "The Times" and the encryption would not accept Indians. As a result, the telegram was: "May 29 - all is well."
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #51 on: January 07, 2016, 05:27:31 PM »
Peru, 1 Nuevo Sol, 2011, Machu Picchu.
The peak of Huayna Picchu is about 2,720 metres above sea level, or about 360 metres higher than Machu Picchu.

"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #52 on: January 07, 2016, 10:23:10 PM »
I have taken practically the same picture (most tourists do.) What you don't realise from such a picture is that Machu Picchu is quite high up to begin with and that there is a deep gorge between Machu Picchu and Huayna Picchu, making the mountain even more impressive, seen from Machu Picchu.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #53 on: January 08, 2016, 09:07:39 AM »
I have taken practically the same picture (most tourists do.)
It was a difficult tour?
This picture it is necessary to see with their own eyes.
At the highest point can be reached by steps. You climbed to the very top?
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #54 on: January 08, 2016, 01:57:24 PM »
Yes, I went to the top for my picture (this was BC - before computers, cannot locate photo now). I gained time by giving away my lunch and saw everything that could be reached on foot. It was indeed the most adventurous tourist trip I ever made. However, the part on the mountain was a relatively easy stretch. I was a good walker and climber at the time and I had gotten used to the thin air in Cuzco with the help of some unmentionable plants ;D Getting back to Paris was the hard part. :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #55 on: January 08, 2016, 05:50:26 PM »
French Polynesia, 50 fr., 2006.
This is also a beautiful place. Mo'orea is a high island in French Polynesia, one of the Windward Islands, part of the Society Islands, 17 kilometres northwest of Tahiti.

Cook's Bay and Mount Rōtui, 899 m.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #56 on: January 09, 2016, 05:55:21 PM »
Not that it matters, but the warship in thepicture is the French frigate Prairial, based in Papeete.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #57 on: January 09, 2016, 06:20:51 PM »
Not that it matters, but the warship in thepicture is the French frigate Prairial, based in Papeete.
These guys have served in paradise. :)
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Gusev

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #58 on: March 20, 2016, 07:14:24 PM »
Sri Lanka, 5 Rupee, 2006.
Adam's Peak 2,243 m.

It is revered as a holy site by Buddhists, Hindus, Muslims and Christians. It has specific qualities that cause it to stand out and be noticed; including its dominant and outstanding profile, and the boulder at the peak that contains an indentation resembling a footprint.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #59 on: March 21, 2016, 12:57:12 PM »
What a beautiful photo, it fills my heart with mountain longing.
-- Paul