Author Topic: Mountains and volcanoes on coins  (Read 24630 times)

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Offline bart

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2011, 10:55:13 PM »
Some coins of the Philippines show a smoking volcano.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 03:27:32 PM by coffeetime »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2011, 12:24:32 AM »
Practically all modern coins of San Marino have three mountains, which is unfair, because it's their coat of arms and because there's not enough place for three mountains in the whole country.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2011, 12:41:17 AM »
Practically all modern coins of San Marino have three mountains, which is unfair, because it's their coat of arms and because there's not enough place for three mountains in the whole country.

Peter

I thought it was three peaks on the one mountain, a bit like the twin peaks on Mt Tsukuba in Japan (which leads, not surprisingly, to numerous maternal references to the mountain in Japanese folklore ...)

Offline WillieBoyd2

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2011, 04:01:23 PM »
The United States Colorado State Quarter has Longs Peak on the reverse.

I hiked up Longs Peak in 1980.

:)
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Offline bart

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2011, 04:17:16 PM »
Here's another coin with a mountain: 1 rial SH1371 (1992) from I.R. of Iran

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2011, 10:56:52 PM »
Amazing how mny of these mountains are on real coins. Maybe a mountain is the ultimate neutral symbol that people still can relate to.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Bimat

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #21 on: April 18, 2011, 05:13:40 PM »
The latest Iranian 1000 Rial (2011) commemorative showing mountain. (The top coin)



Aditya
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Offline <k>

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #22 on: August 21, 2011, 03:10:16 AM »
Austria, 10 Groschen, 1925.  Tyrolean woman, with the Alps in the background.

Offline Prosit

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #23 on: August 21, 2011, 04:19:07 AM »
Not a coin.....which is a common response when I post in these thematic areas.
Which I wish had a slightly more broader scope than coins,...


Großglockner is, at 12,460 ft above sea level, Austria's highest mountain and the highest mountain
in the Alps east of the Brenner Pass. This makes it, after Mont Blanc, the second tallest mountain in
the Alps, when measured by relative height.

I am quite proud to say this one is in my own collection.

While I have a love affair with cheap tokens and medals, this one is not in that catagory.
Those days I could afford to pursue this interest is long past.
However I can still enjoy the ones I do have  :D
Dale
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 04:27:05 AM by dalehall »

Offline chrisild

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #24 on: August 21, 2011, 10:26:10 AM »
As for the scope, well, I believe that in a coin forum we should focus on coins - but that does not mean medals or other exonumia are verboten, of course. The point where I would start sighing is when (if) people started posting all kinds of topic-related but not really numismatic images: of paintings, videos ("here we are in front of the Mount Blahblah"), colored mini-versions of mountains ...

Here is another "non-coin" with mountains. Or rather a "not-yet-coin" - the piece will be issued in early February. This is next year's €2 commem from the German States series, honoring Bavaria. Usually the pieces from that series feature one building only, but here the artist (Erich Ott) added a line in the background which indicates that the castle (Neuschwanstein) is in the mountains.

Christian

Offline andyg

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #25 on: August 21, 2011, 10:35:56 AM »
Both the Iranian coins upthread show Mount Damāvand, the highest volcano in Asia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damavand

(I'll not link to the picture lest I get in trouble ;))
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Offline <k>

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #26 on: August 31, 2011, 12:42:51 AM »
Here is a nice pattern coin from Nicaragua dated 1860. Note the misspelling of centavo.



 
« Last Edit: August 26, 2017, 02:26:16 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2011, 12:43:39 AM »
And a rare one peso coin of Chile, dated 1825.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2017, 02:25:30 PM by <k> »

translateltd

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #28 on: August 31, 2011, 09:07:19 AM »
Note the misspelling of centavo.


Funny, but not entirely beyond imagining, especially as in parts of Latin America B and V are pronounced exactly the same (I once had a friend from Nicaragua who was regularly asking me - I know not why - if I had seen his pal Bustos anywhere; the question "Has visto a Bustos?" always came out as "Ah bihto a buhtoh?")

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Mountains and volcanoes on coins
« Reply #29 on: August 31, 2011, 11:41:41 PM »
Some people from what is now Indonesia have the same tendency. One colleague early in my career had a roommate called Varkevisser, who he referred to as Parkepisser.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.