Author Topic: Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785  (Read 628 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Gusev

  • Moderator
  • Meritorious Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 861
Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785
« on: September 16, 2017, 09:05:43 PM »
Ceylon, KM#32.
It was decided by a Res. of Colombo dated 1785 Oct. 20, to strike Half copper Larins in the shape of small bars with two round countermarks on either end and declare them current at the rate of 4 3/4 Indian Stuivers or Half Larin.

Obverse : Two round countermarks stamped on either end of bar; within a rim of of beads outside a plain circle - On left: 4 3/4 ST ; On right: VOC monogram, below C (Colombo)
Reverse : Same

VOC monogram of the Dutch East India Company has a large V superimposed on OC.

The length and weight of these flattened bars of Japanese copper bars often differs considerably from 58 to 105 mm and from 54 to 62 grams. The legal weight based at that eras copper standard in Stuivers should be 63.413 grams.

http://coins.lakdiva.org

Teutoburger Münzauktion GmbH, Auction 110, 8 - 9 September 2017, Lot 149, Starting price: 180 EUR, Price realized: 550 EUR.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Pellinore

  • Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 161
    • Some numismatic books for sale on our website
Re: Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2017, 09:22:00 PM »
Strange denomination, four and three quarters. Is that a tax thing?
-- Paul

Offline Gusev

  • Moderator
  • Meritorious Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 861
Re: Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2017, 09:37:42 PM »
Is that a tax thing?
-- Paul

This is a very rare coin, 4 3/4 Stuivers = Half Larin
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 279
Re: Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2017, 02:47:51 PM »
The coin is very popular among Dutch collectors. It is one of the hardest Dutch colonial coins types to find (not counting patterns). It was also one of the first to be faked in Indonesia...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline lakdiva

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • Coins and Banknotes of Ceylon & Lanka
Re: Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2019, 10:04:20 AM »
The specimen shown above is most probably only a nice replica.
Not a cheap one mass produced for the tourists in Galle.
However many features of the lettering is wrong.
Dr Kavan
Coins @http://coins.lakdiva.org since 300 BCE and
Banknotes @http://notes.lakdiva.org since 1795 CE.

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29 279
Re: Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2019, 11:42:14 AM »
The Dutch national collection had at least one genuine specimen. AFAIK, it's the only genuine one I have seen.

Indeed, it is the equivalent in copper of a silver larin. Perhaps that is the reason for the elongated form, which may remind you of some larin types. I would consider it an emergency issue. Keep in mind that the decision to make them was taken in Colombo, while VOC policy was that as much as possible, colonial coins should be struck in the Netherlands.

The emergency was the French and British jockeying over positions on the sailing route from Europe to India, exemplified by the Mysore wars and leading to a change of colonial masters in, among others, Mauritius, the Seychelles and Madagascar. Declared and undeclared wars showed up as piracy in the Pacific and Indian oceans. "Inspections" for "contraband" of ships of neutral countries, could easily lead to the theft of the ship and its cargo. Only convoys with naval escorts could make it in relative safety and the Republic had under-invested in its navy for decades. That would have made silver even scarcer than usual.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Oesho

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3 377
Re: Ceylon, Bonk bar, 4 3/4 Stuiver, 1785
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2019, 12:47:50 AM »
The 4 3/4 stiver or better to say ½ larin may be an odd denomination, but due to shortage of silver emergency coins of ½ larins were produced. At that time the silver larin was valued at 9,5 stiver. So half of it would be 4 3/4 stiver.
95% or even more of this coin type seen, are fakes, but occasionally genuine pieces are met with. See Zeno - Oriental Coins Database - Dutch Ceylon, VOC, 4 3/4 Stiver (1/2 larin),