login

Author Topic: 1821 - 1850, 1 cash, China Empire - Emperor Daoguang, mint: Beijing  (Read 200 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline @josephjk

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 224
4 grams, 24 mm... thanks
« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 04:29:31 PM by @josephjk »

Offline @josephjk

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 224
Re: China Empire (?) - please help ID
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 04:04:51 PM »
Update... identified as
1821 1 cash, China Empire - Emperor Daoguang, mint: Boo-chiowan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daoguang_Emperor

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 25 550
Re: China Empire (?) - please help ID
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2017, 04:15:48 PM »
Agreed, except for the date and mint. Boo-chiowan, the Manchu characters on the reverse (right picture), means something like department of finance, so if the mint is a expressed as a city, it is Beijing. The Daoguang emperor ruled 1821-1850. The coin is not dated. It may or may not be possible to narrow the date range by looking at subtle detail changes, but the coin is a bit worn, so those details may not be clear enough.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline @josephjk

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1 224
Re: China Empire (?) - please help ID
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2017, 04:28:05 PM »
Thank you Peter... much appreciated!

Offline bgriff99

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 562
Re: 1821 - 1850, 1 cash, China Empire - Emperor Daoguang, mint: Beijing
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2017, 07:28:51 AM »
"Boo chiowan" is a Manchu transliteration of the Chinese characters "Bao quan" 寶 泉, meaning approximately 'treasure source'.     In earlier reigns was worked out this system of showing mints, and also having one side with Chinese, the other Manchu.    Bao is the same word as at left on the obverse.    In the Ming Dynasty the Boards of Revenue and Works had mints also in Nanjing, and controlled others in the provinces.    The Board of War, and some others had their own much smaller mints in the Ming Dynasty.

Under the system where each cash coin had on its reverse "boo x", each provincial mint had a formal name, with its identifying single character used in transliteration.    Usually it was part of the province name.   If that was not available, some historical or literary name was used.   Such was the case where provincial names included "shan" (mountain), "guang" (broad), "Ho" (lake), "Jiang" (large river), etc.    Chinese provinces are really named as Mountains-east, Mountains-west, Canal-north, Canal-south....    Yunnan is Clouds-south, but the only clouds province, as Sichuan (4 rivers) is the only rivers province.    Thus their mint names are yun (clouds) and chuan (rivers) respectively.     

Offline Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 25 550
Re: 1821 - 1850, 1 cash, China Empire - Emperor Daoguang, mint: Beijing
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2017, 09:59:35 AM »
Very interesting, Bruce. I wasn't aware the Boards had a mint in Nanjing. Was this a branch mint, or did the mint just move from Beijing to Nanjing as the latter became capital of all of China? As for the Board of War mint, I assumed those were mobile mints, moving with the army to coin loot and supplies as they need arose.

Indeed, the mints are provincial, but they are at the same time local. The city is just more precise than the province. I presume the mints all answered to a central authority in the capital. The situation was very similar in France. However, there was never a mint for the equivalent of the Board of Works, though at least during one period, Paris had two mints. Dies were prepared in Paris, sent to the provinces, finished in local mints and these mints reported to Paris. The marks (engraver, mint, director of the mint) were much less subtle, but had the same control function.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bgriff99

  • Meritorious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 562
Re: 1821 - 1850, 1 cash, China Empire - Emperor Daoguang, mint: Beijing
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2017, 10:49:51 PM »
The first Ming mint was established in the capital Nanjing (aka Jiangning in Jiangnan Province).   That was the Board of Works.    A second central mint was begun somewhere in Jiangxi Province.   Beijing had a mint before it became the capital.   When it did, the Boards of Revenue and Works maintained larger mints in both capitals, and also controlled some in the provinces.    In the final Ming reign, Chong-zhen, we can recognize the two Boards' markings in Beijing, and the Board of Works in Nanjing, although they mostly did not use mint names on the coins.   There is a likely Board of Revenue-Nanjing type but we can't prove it.

The Boards of Revenue and Works became exclusively associated with Beijing when the Manchus came down in 1644.   The Beijing mints were not really disrupted.   They changed reign titles and continued on as they had.    The Nanjing mint or mints changed to the Southern Ming reign title Hong-guang and continued making cash that looked the same otherwise, but not for long.     The Nanjing Board of Revenue had already closed at that point, so we can't track it that way.

When provincial mints began to open under the Manchus, they reported to the central government directly, via the provincial authorities, and were not subsidiaries of the Boards of Works or Revenue.    A few of them were just garrisons, which cast only for a short time.

The Board of War occasionally cast a few cash in Nanjing, and also contracted some issues from the central mints.   We know little about that.    During the late Ming there are some issues, obviously from hinterland areas which were probably garrisons.