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Author Topic: Text and Fonts on Coins  (Read 33061 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2011, 01:24:59 PM »
On this Swedish 1 öre coin of 1958, the text has been presented in an unusual way. The text sits within a series of incuse boxes, so that the engraving combines with the positioning to produce an unusual and original result.

« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 08:26:16 PM by coffeetime »

Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2011, 01:40:06 PM »
The predecimal coins of Ireland used Gaelic descriptions for their denominations, and they were presented in an unusual font.



« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 09:24:34 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2011, 01:53:13 PM »
The coins of Yugoslavia are an interesting case, since that country was "biscriptual", meaning its peoples wrote in two different alphabets: the Latin (Roman) alphabet and the Cyrillic alphabet.

Here are three coins of Yugoslavia, all from 1938.



10 dinar, 1938.





20 dinar, 1938.





50 dinar, 1938.





The font on this Yugoslav 1938 one dinar coin is also interesting.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 09:28:48 PM by <k> »

Offline chrisild

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2011, 02:05:55 PM »
The coins of the Irish Free State use Gaelic descriptions for their denominations, and they are presented in an unusual font.

Even today, the coins from Ireland - circulation, commemorative and collector coins - all have the country name in that font. (The only exception is the Ivan Meštrović piece issued in 2007, but that was a joint Croatian-Irish issue.) The €2 commem that came out in 2007 (50 Years Treaty of Rome) even has some more text in Irish, along with the common design:

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2011, 02:07:09 PM »
When I say "text on coins", I shall include numerals too, because I am making a distinction between the pictorial and non-pictorial elements of the design.

The English numismatic designer Percy Metcalfe was famous for the distinctive art deco style that he brought to his designs. He even extended this to the numerals he used. Here is an example on the Bulgarian 100 leva coin of 1934. The numeral 9 in the year 1934 appears particularly angular and stylised.





Here is the reverse of an Iraqi 4 fils coin, dated 1938. On the left-hand side, Metcalfe shows the numerals of the Western calendar year in Arabic style, while on the right-hand side he shows the local cultural version, again in Arabic style, but both are highly stylised, and I have not seen anything similar on the coins of other countries that use Arabic script.





Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2011, 02:09:59 PM »
The numeral 5, as used on this Turkish 5 kurus of 1942, is also highly stylised, and reminiscent of some of Percy Metcalfe's numerals, though I do not know who designed this coin.


Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2011, 02:19:11 PM »
The fonts chosen for denominations can be quite varied. They are also often very noticeable, since the numerals of a denomination of a coin often dominate the design in a way that alphabetic text rarely does.

The numerals on this Dutch coin are rather fancy.





The 50 on the Belgian coin is rather unusual.





The rather plain but elongated numerals on this coin from Luxembourg still make a statement.

« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 08:50:09 PM by coffeetime »

Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2011, 02:23:26 PM »
An arty looking font is used for the text and numerals on this Spanish commemorative coin.


Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2011, 02:25:11 PM »
An innovative "50" on a 90-year-old Romanian coin.


Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #24 on: August 14, 2011, 02:27:32 PM »
Whenever I look at this coin, I think that the zero doesn't go with the five in the "50" denomination.


Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2011, 02:33:23 PM »
The numerals on some coins are outlined, but the outlines on this Maltese 50 cents are carefully filled in with horizontal lines. Such elaborately designed numerals are less common these days, I find, but I always enjoy looking at them.


Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2011, 02:40:02 PM »
Croatia, 2 kune, 1995.  The letters making up the FAO abbreviation are stylishly arranged.


Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2011, 02:41:47 PM »
A fancy 5 on a Danish coin of 1874.


Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2011, 02:51:19 PM »
A particularly unusual 50 on this Gambian coin.





By his style shall you know him. This Swaziland coin and the Gambian one were both designed by Michael Rizzello.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 09:26:36 PM by <k> »

Offline <k>

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Re: Text and Fonts on Coins
« Reply #29 on: August 14, 2011, 02:58:21 PM »
The legend overlays the denominational numeral on this coin, but it is large enough and distinctive enough to shine through.



Ceylon became Sri Lanka, and here the same trick is used again.

« Last Edit: August 14, 2011, 03:06:08 PM by coffeetime »