Author Topic: The expected but missing denomination  (Read 1314 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2020, 06:02:59 PM »
The UK decimal coin series was introduced in 1971. However, for many years it lacked a circulating denomination between the 10 and 50 pence coins. In 1982 a 20 pence coin was introduced.

Interestingly, commemorative non-circulating 25 pence coins were issued occasionally. The final one issued was in 1981, to commemorate the wedding of Charles and Diana. The government decided that it was no longer economical to issue commemorative coins with such a low face value. In 1982 the 20 pence coin was introduced, so a 20 pence coin and a 25 pence coin never co-existed. In 1986 a non-circulating commemorative 2 pound coin was issued to celebrate the Commonwealth Games. The commemorative 2 pound coin then became standard, replacing the 25 pence coin.
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2020, 06:12:09 PM »
I find it curious that India lacked a 1 anna coin for a considerable period (from at least the start of the unified EIC coinage in 1835 until the cupro-nickel 1 anna of Edward VII in 1903). There was also no half-anna from the demise of the large copper piece in the 1870s until the small square half-anna was introduced in the 1940s.

So, from 1877 to 1903, the available coins were twelfth, eighth and quarter anna, then 2 annas and upwards.

Structurally, this is the equivalent of a £sd coinage lacking both a sixpence and a shilling (though I realise the value of the anna was considerably less than a shilling). It's also unusual I think to lack the 1 denomination of a basic unit when smaller denominations are still being made.

Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2020, 06:13:41 PM »
That is a very strange case, and one I had never noticed.
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Offline FosseWay

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2020, 06:18:20 PM »
Also, the concurrent use for ages of the twelfth anna and the half pice (eighth anna) perplexes me. There was never a coin worth half a pie, or 1/24th anna, but the half pice was worth 1½ pies. I struggle to see how change was made in some circumstances.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2020, 06:25:01 PM »
Looking at India some more, there's rather a big gap during George V's reign between the largest silver denomination (1 rupee) and the smallest (actually only, AFAIK) gold one, the mohur of 15 rupees (which appears to have been equivalent to the sovereign - at any rate, they weigh the same and have the same fineness). So, in £sd terms, no coin between 1s 4d and £1. (Though I imagine that if sovereigns were usable in India, then so would half-sovs have been, at a face value of 7 rupees 8 annas.)

Earlier British Indian coinages had gold 10 and 5 rupee coins alongside the mohur, but during Edward VII's reign apparently no gold was struck at all.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2020, 12:27:31 AM »
Never could figure out why the Netherlands stopped producing 1/2 gulden coins in the 30s and never resumed?

In the last pre-decimal series, there was a half gulden (X stuivers). It was a relatively recent denomination, which may have been the reason it was unpopular. At some point, the half gulden was minted for the Netherlands Indies only. They could circulate in the homeland, but rarely did.

Its last hurrah was in late 1939 and early 1940. Submarines and raiders closed the sea connection between the Netherlands and its colonies. Coins containing silver disappeared from circulation as the war threat rose. The Dutch government disposed of a large shipment of halves that couldn't be sent by circulating them in the Netherlands. They were hoarded also, of course. After the second world war, an uprising started in the Netherlands Indies that ended in an independent Indonesia, so that there was no reason to mint halves any more.

Also, I figure this probably is outside of the scope of this topic, but the economies based on the "cash" have always fascinated me, namely because almost none had successfully introduced multiple denominations. The result is an economy where you have to pay a money-counter to tie together a "string" of 1,000 coins.

I don't pretend to know if it was the decisive issue, but the Chinese emperors were traditionally against multiple cash coins. Somewhere in Peng Xinwei is a quote from a letter quoting the emperor, explaining that the cash were shamefully underweight and multiple cash would be underweight even more. Nevertheless, from Wang Mang onwards, multiple cash were issued regularly, though most in limited numbers. Double cash look like standard cash coins, but are somewhat heavier and relatively common. More important, silver ingots (sycee, traditionally rated at around a string of cash per ounce of silver) and mulberry paper notes denominated in cash or strings saw circulation, especially when the Qing were weakening.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2020, 11:25:30 PM »


South Korea lacks a 25 won coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2020, 11:41:19 PM »
Equatorial Guinea set, 1969.  There was no 10 pesetas coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2020, 11:51:28 PM »
Spain lacked a 10 pesetas coin until 1983.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2020, 11:55:24 PM »


The current Romanian set lacks a 25 bani coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2020, 11:59:28 PM »
Cyprus lacked a 10 mils coin in the 1950s.











3     mils.  Stylised flying-fish.
5     mils.  Bronze age man carrying copper bar.
25   mils.  Head of bull.
50   mils.  Fern leaves.
100 mils.  Merchant ship, circa 6th century B.C.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #26 on: October 06, 2020, 12:00:46 AM »


And in the 1960s. There was a 1 mil coin but it is not included in the image.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #27 on: October 06, 2020, 12:02:28 AM »
Don't see a "lack" there (Romania, South Korea). They simply decided that a 20 – or 25 if you prefer – coin is not necessary. Coming from a country that did just fine with a similar gap, I do not have any problems with that. :D In the Federal Republic of Germany, before the euro, it was actually a little odd since we had a 0.02 coin and a 2.00 coin but not a 0.20 coin.

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2020, 12:17:48 AM »
What you never have, you never miss, so they say. It's all subjective, of course, but to me it stands out as a lack.
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Offline <k>

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Re: The expected but missing denomination
« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2020, 12:29:19 AM »




Guinea-Bissau, 1977.  A missing 10 always stands out more than a missing 20 (pesos), I think.

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