Author Topic: Oranges banknote  (Read 506 times)

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Offline Pellinore

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Oranges banknote
« on: August 07, 2017, 01:46:34 PM »
Just found a picture of this funny 'banknote' in a collection of printed orange tissue papers (assembled by artist Gertie Jaquet and book designer Harry Sierman). It shows a Dutch thousand guilder banknote that was introduced in 1926 (about the value of a new car in those days), and it says in Dutch "The Sweetest Oranges in the World". Maybe in other orange export countries other banknotes were used. 
Please compare with the original 1000 guilder banknote: the names of the Secretary and the President of the Orange Bank are Spanish!

-- Paul


Offline Figleaf

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Re: Oranges banknote
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2017, 01:56:37 PM »
Good fun advertising. Wikipedia says:
Quote
Alzira has historically been a walled town, surrounded by palm, orange and mulberry groves
and
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Agriculture was the prime economic driving force in Alzira up to the mid-20th century. The most important produce are oranges and they are distributed by important local co-operatives.

Nothing about the Dutch importers, who, presumably, had this printed.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Pellinore

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Re: Oranges banknote
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2017, 01:34:20 AM »
Wouldn't you think it was printed in Spain? It looks like the designer doesn't quite understand what's what at the banknote.
-- Paul

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Oranges banknote
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2017, 12:11:07 PM »
I have no idea where the wrappers were added. However, the Dutch is correct and there's not a word of Spanish on the wrapper. Obviously, this wrapper is for the Dutch market only and other markets (e.g. Germany, France) would be a lot bigger, so an importer would be far more motivated than an exporter to produce such a complicated wrapper design. All in all, a Dutch printer seems more likely to me. However, I have been wrong before ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.