Author Topic: Designing coins for the US  (Read 4444 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Designing coins for the US
« on: August 29, 2009, 03:39:24 AM »
The US mint is looking for coin designers. Foreign designers need not apply.

http://www.usmint.gov/about_the_mint/artisticInfusion/index.cfm?action=CallForArtists&flash=yes

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Designing coins for the US
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2009, 12:54:24 PM »
My favourite page was on the US Mint Police (this is not a joke). They were able to put a series of pictures on the page without any submachine guns, cannons or atomic weapons in sight. Civilized.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Designing coins for the US
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2009, 06:45:32 PM »
Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Seeks New Members
By: PR Newswire, Oct. 2, 2009 12:34 PM

WASHINGTON, Oct. 2 -- The United States Mint is seeking applicants for appointment to the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC). There are two open positions -- one who is specially qualified in American history and one who is specially qualified in medallic arts or sculpture. The application deadline is November 13, 2009. The United States Mint will review all applications and forward recommendations to the Secretary of the Treasury for consideration and appointment.

The CCAC was created to advise the Secretary of the Treasury on the selection of themes and design proposals for circulating coinage, bullion coinage, Congressional Gold Medals and other medals. The CCAC also advises the Secretary with regard to the events, persons, or places to be commemorated by the issuance of commemorative coins, as well as mintage levels and proposed designs of commemorative coins.

The CCAC is composed of 11 members -- one specially qualified in numismatic collection curation; one specially qualified in the medallic arts or sculpture; one specially qualified in American history; one specially qualified in numismatics; three individuals representing the interests of the general public; and four individuals recommended by the Leadership of both the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. CCAC members serve terms of four years and are Special Government Employees, who are subject to applicable conflict of interest laws and ethics regulations.

Individuals wanting to be considered for appointment as a CCAC member who is specially qualified in American history or specially qualified in medallic arts or sculpture should submit a letter, along with a resume or curriculum vitae, detailing specific educational credentials, skills, talents and experience. Applicants must specify the position for which they would like to be considered. Applications should be submitted by fax to 202-756-6525, or by mail to the United States Mint, 801 9th St., N.W., Washington, DC 20220, Attn: Greg Weinman. Submissions must be postmarked no later than November 13, 2009.

Source: SOA World Magazine
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Designing coins for the US
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2011, 12:10:11 AM »
(Media-Newswire.com) - WASHINGTON - The United States Mint is accepting applications to the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee ( CCAC ) for a new member who is specially qualified in numismatics.  The application deadline is April 8, 2011.  The United States Mint will review all applications and forward recommendations to the Secretary of the Treasury for consideration and appointment. 

The CCAC was created to advise the Secretary of the Treasury on the selection of themes and design proposals for circulating coinage, bullion coinage, Congressional Gold Medals and other medals.  The CCAC also advises the Secretary with regard to the events, persons, or places to be commemorated by the issuance of commemorative coins, as well as mintage levels and proposed designs of commemorative coins.

The CCAC is composed of 11 members-one specially qualified in numismatic collection curation; one specially qualified in the medallic arts or sculpture; one specially qualified in American history; one specially qualified in numismatics; three individuals representing the interests of the general public; and four individuals recommended by the Leadership of both the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate.  CCAC members serve terms of four years and are Special Government Employees, who are subject to applicable conflict of interest laws and ethics regulations.

Individuals wanting to be considered for appointment as a CCAC member who is specially qualified in numismatics by virtue of education, training or experience should submit a letter, along with a resume or curriculum vitae, detailing specific educational credentials, skills, talents and experience.  Applications should be submitted by fax to 202-756-6525, or by email to gweinman@usmint.treas.gov, or by mail to the United States Mint, 801 9th St., N.W., Washington, DC 20220, Attn:  Greg Weinman.  Submissions must be postmarked no later than April 8, 2011.

Customer Service information:  ( 800 ) USA MINT ( 872-6468 )

Source: Media Newswire
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Designing coins for the US
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2011, 12:11:44 AM »
Funnily, they didn't think of requiring that applicants should be U.S. citizens. I bet it is a requirement, though.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Designing coins for the US
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2011, 12:23:18 AM »
As it's the US Mint, and they refer to the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (emphasis by me), that would indeed make a lot of sense. :)

Christian

Offline Bimat

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Designing coins for the US
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2014, 12:06:23 PM »
The U.S. Mint is looking to collect a few more artists

Jan. 9, 2014, 6:00 a.m. EST

By Christina Rexrod

NEW YORK (MarketWatch) — A coin is not just currency, it’s a very small work of art, or so goes the thinking at the U.S. Mint.

And so the Mint, the coin factory of the Department of the Treasury, is seeking a few new artists to render up the mountains and valleys, eagles and oaks, and other graven images that adorn U.S. coins both common and collective.

It’s partly because there’s so much work to do. The Mint, which used to release nary a new coin, is stamping out quarters in honor of national parks, $10 gold coins for the First Ladies, and $1 Native American coins, among other endeavors.

It’s also because of a percolating sense that the Mint, which turns 222 this year, might benefit from a broader range of artistic fancy. The Mint’s now-former director proclaimed in a paper a few years back that there was “still much room for improvement” in the way of U.S. coin design. After that, an advisory body found that Mint artists were too regimented to be very creative, consigned to the same old styles on coin after coin. This is the Mint’s first call for new contract artists since 2009, and the first since the report.

There’s talk of perhaps making U.S. coin designs more symbolic, or more contemporary. “We don’t know what we don’t know,” mused Greg Weinman, senior legal counsel at the U.S. Mint, when asked if even modern art could grace a U.S. coin. “That doesn’t mean that there aren’t other artistic styles that wouldn’t work on coins. And we’re open to that.”

The Mint’s program for contract artists, called the Artistic Infusion Program, or AIP, is accepting applications through Friday. Click here to find out how to apply.

The Mint already has some in-house artists, in the form of seven sculptor-engravers in Philadelphia who transfer designs from paper to sculptural models, though they also can submit designs for new coins. The Mint also has six contract artists that it found through AIP, though it used to have about 20 when the program started in 2003. The ranks have dwindled as artists’ contracts expired or they drifted away to endeavors with bigger palettes or looser deadlines.

There’s not just any old way that you can design a coin, after all, despite the Mint’s professed open-mindedness.

The process starts when the Mint asks its artists, both in-house and contract, to submit designs. That’s followed by months of committee meetings, continued research and, some would say, nitpicking.

Lots of designs might be inspiring but not “coinable” —for example, if one portion might outweigh the rest of the coin and prevent the metal from flowing correctly. It has to work well within defined borders, not like a watercolor that can ooze to the edges of a canvas. And it has to be recognizable on a very small surface.

No detail is too small to escape someone’s forming an opinion. Get a button askew on a military uniform, and you can trust that service members will notice.

“If you have a close-up of part of a tree, you better make sure the bark on that tree is right,” said April Stafford, who runs the Artistic Infusion Program.

A proposed design for the coin honoring Eliza Johnson, wife of President Andrew Johnson, featured a sewing machine because the president was a tailor in his early career. Or rather, it did until a member of the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee pointed out that such a sewing machine hadn’t been invented at the time.

The committee, established by Congress in 2003 to advise the Treasury on coin designs and themes, is mandated to include an expert on U.S. history and another on coin collection, among others.

Source: Market Watch
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Online Figleaf

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Re: Designing coins for the US
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2014, 06:14:21 PM »
As it's the US Mint, and they refer to the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (emphasis by me), that would indeed make a lot of sense.

Problem being that the US is a member of WTO and a signatory of the government procurement agreement, therefore subject to its article III, which forbids discrimination of suppliers by nationality.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.