Author Topic: Luxembourg  (Read 712 times)

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Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2017, 04:47:04 PM »
25 centimes 1927, copper-nickel, weight - 5,5 g., size - 25 mm, thickness - 1,4 mm, mintage - 2500000 pcs. Engraver: Alexandre Everaerts. Single release. Demonetized at January 1 1953.


Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2017, 04:51:36 PM »
50 centimes 1930, nickel, weight - 3,14 g., size - 19,1 mm, thickness - 1,5 mm, mintage - 2000000 pcs. Engraver: Armand Bonnetain. Single release. Demonetized at January 1 1953.

Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2017, 04:53:11 PM »
1 franc 1928, nickel, weight - 5 g., size - 23 mm, thickness - 2 mm, mintage - 2000000 pcs. Engraver: Armand Bonnetain. Such coins were released at 1924, 1928 & 1935. Demonetized at January 1 1953.

Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2017, 04:55:56 PM »
1 franc 1939, copper-nickel, weight - 6,5 g., size - 24 mm, thickness - 2 mm, mintage - 5000000 pcs. Engraver: Armand Bonnetain. Single release. Demonetized at January 1 1953.

Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2017, 04:59:09 PM »
1 franc 1962, copper-nickel, weight - 4 g., size - 21 mm, thickness - 1,6 mm, mintage - 2000000 pcs. Engraver: Armand Bonnetain. Such coins were released at 1952-53, 1955, 1957, 1960, 1962 and 1964. Demonetized at January 11 1991.

Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2017, 05:02:03 PM »
2  francs 1924, nickel, weight - 10 g., size - 27 mm, mintage - 1000000 pcs. Engraver: Armand Bonnetain. Single release.

Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2017, 05:06:51 PM »
5  francs 1949, copper-nickel, weight - 7 g., size - 25,5 mm, thickness - 1,9 mm, mintage - 2000000 pcs. Engraver: Armand Bonnetain. Single release. Demonetized at February 1 1963.

Offline Siberian Man

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2017, 05:11:27 PM »
5  francs 1962, copper-nickel, weight - 6 g., size - 24 mm, thickness - 1,8 mm, mintage - 2000000 pcs. Engraver: Julien and Nina Lefevre. Single release. Demonetized at January 15 1987.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2017, 08:34:31 PM »
Much of the symbolism concerns agriculture and a steel plant worker, probably meant to stand for industry. The mining sector and steel industry have largely disappeared from the Benelux countries and agriculture is becoming more marginal every year, giving the designs a quaint and old-fashioned look - compare the miner's head on Belgium last small bronze coins. Today, the Luxembourg economy floats on the financial sector and tourists, attracted by large wooded areas that invite hiking (as long as the weather co-operates). That's hard to put on a coin.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline maudry

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #24 on: December 25, 2017, 09:13:01 PM »
Nice collection.
Allow me to add my favorite coin from Luxembourg.
100  francs 1946, silver, weight - 25 g., size - 37 mm, thickness , mintage - 100000 pcs (including the 2000 restrikes). Engraver: Armand Bonnetain. Single release. Demonetized in 1955.
2000 pieces were restruck in 1964 while retaining the mintage year of 1946. The name of the engraver was forgotten on the right and the reverse.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Luxembourg
« Reply #25 on: December 25, 2017, 11:49:38 PM »
I understand this coin. In 1946, it was important to assert Luxembourg's independence and its own culture and language. Luxembourg doesn't have a large portfolio of heroes, so Jang de Blannen had to do. The coin may have been inspired by the medallion on his monument in Crécy, the place where he died. It doesn't take much research to realise how misleading his romantic and chivalrous legend is.

The text on his monument is A Jean de Luxembourg, roi de Bohème et à ses vaillants compagnons d'armes morts pour la France à Crécy (to John of Luxembourg, king of Bohemia and to his valiant companions who died for France in Crécy.) That's slightly nearer to the truth than the coin. Johannes der Blinde was king of Bohemia, but a son of the house of Luxembourg. Among his minor titles was count of Luxembourg, but he hated the place and IIRC spent very little time in his county.

Johannes joined the French king in his war against the English for one reason only: money. His Bohemian nobility did not accept him and kept him out of his own country. Money would have solved that problem. Being blind, he didn't effectively take part in the battle of Crécy (his son Charles did, though), but kept himself informed on the course of the battle through his herald. As the first French battle (division) advanced, the English right wing, led by the Black Prince, seemed to be faltering. Johannes apparently thought the French - who were numerically superior - would break through and win the battle. If the English crown prince and maybe the king could be captured, they would command an immense ransom. However, neither would surrender to a lesser noblemen. They would surrender to another king.

Johannes solved the situation by ordering his house karls (body guards or "companions") to tie their horses to his, so he couldn't get lost, and advance towards the Black Prince. However, by the time the group reached the Black Prince's division, it had been reinforced and they were pushing the French back. Their horses being tied together, Johannes' group was unable to turn around. They were slaughtered to a man. Thus, his death was neither chivalric, nor in French service, but the consequence of greed, a wrong calculation and a pretty stupid idea that killed him and his house karls, whether valiant or not.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.