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Author Topic: Medal: Napoleon I, Coronation Festivities, 1804  (Read 108 times)

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Offline Overlord

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Medal: Napoleon I, Coronation Festivities, 1804
« on: July 15, 2017, 09:49:39 AM »
Weight=178 g
Diameter=68.2 mm
Thickness=6.7 mm

Could someone please identify the restrike year from the edge markings?



Obverse:Napoleon's laureate head facing left; around, NAPOLIO IMPERATOR; below, GALLE FECIT


Reverse: Napoleon in Roman armour, seated on an elevated platform, he holds in his left hand the staff of royalty, surmounted by the eagle of France; and receives the City of Paris, head turretted; behind her, on the right, an ship, with a winged Cupid holding the rudder with his head is turned towards the star of destiny in the centre of which is the letter N; around above, TVTELA PRAESENS. in exergue, EPVLVM SOLLEMNE / IMPERATORIS IN CVRIA / VRBANA . FRIM . A . XIII.; the names of the artists, PRUDMON DEL. JEUFFROY FEC. on the exergue line.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Medal: Napoleon I, Coronation Festivities, 1804
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2017, 02:42:18 PM »
Can't help with the date of the restrike.

The Latin text EPVLVM SOLLEMNE / IMPERATORIS IN CVRIA / VRBANA . FRIMaire . Anno . XIII means "(A) formal banquet (offered) for the emperor in the city hall. (25) Frimaire of the year 13" The second phrase is a revolutionary date that converts to 16th December 1804.

The allegory is Napoleon as Roman emperor with sceptre crowned by his emblem (Napoleon is the emperor of France; his coronation took place in 1804) being welcomed by Paris. The ship stands for the government, which is guided by love (Cupid), for Paris, of course :). The legend on top is something like "his presence protects her". The medal may refer here to Napoleon's absence during the campaigns in Germany and his return for the coronation ceremony. In modern US parlance, hey big guy, it's OK to play in Germanland for a while, but bring some expensive souvenirs when you come back.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Overlord

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Re: Medal: Napoleon I, Coronation Festivities, 1804
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2017, 03:03:41 PM »
Thank you for the translation.  :)