Author Topic: Dutch delights  (Read 5457 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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Dutch delights
« on: August 22, 2009, 01:30:11 AM »
The Dutch government never bothered to show designs that didn't make it, with one exception. When the present queen succeeded her mother, the Ministry of Finance issued a booklet on the new coins and the other designs. The first set is by Jaap Drupsteen, a well-known graphic designer who made a number of stamp designs.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2009, 01:42:02 AM »
In this case, I like the ones that were actually minted better. Also, I think that the "Hulde aan de gulden" exhibition in Rotterdam a few years ago http://www.kunsthal.nl/22-246-Hulde_aan_de_gulden.html showed some of the designs that did not make it. Have not been there, but an info file about the show says: "Onder de andere muntontwerpen, die als gips- of bronsmodel zijn uitgevoerd, bevinden zich prachtige voorbeelden van miniatuurbeeldhouwkunst, gemaakt door ontwerpers als L.O. Wenckebach, C.J. van der Hoef en H.Luns."

Christian

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2009, 01:44:40 AM »
Here is the design of medallist Christina Nijland, popular in North America, not too known in the Netherlands. I am really glad this design didn't make it. The lay-outs are impractical, too much alike and I think the design is downright boring.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2009, 01:50:04 AM »
Since Wenkebach died in 1962 that couldn't be the same occasion. I believe I have been to that exhibition. It was mostly on banknotes.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Galapagos

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2009, 01:56:20 AM »
The placing of the numerals on the reverse of the images in the initial post is very bold. I like the way they stretch over and beyond the background figures, giving an almost 3D effect.

My dad used to collect stamps, and the Royal Mail bulletins he used to buy showed unsuccessful "essays" often enough. We do get to see them occasionally in the coin world. The ones that most appeal to me are the unadopted wartime Croatian designs.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2009, 02:02:48 AM »
Marte Röling is a well-known graphic artist, whose designs are often big and very colourful, such as theater decors and the Amsterdam tramways. I find these designs too busy, but creative and interesting.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2009, 02:11:30 AM »
Jan Snoeck is an experienced maker of abstract medals. It shows. His reverses are great, stylish, with excellent visual effects, but his portrait could have been better.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2009, 02:28:06 AM »
Jan van Toorn is a typographic artist. He designed a number of stamps. In this series he successfully devised a way to distinguish the denominations on both sides of the coin, which I find quite innovative. Note how he had reserved a place for a half gulden. There are some fun effects from the way he placed his typographical elements. Maybe he should have presented the series with more light and shadow and less relief.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 22, 2009, 02:31:41 AM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Galapagos

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2009, 02:38:04 AM »
Jan van Toorn is a typographic artist. In this series he successfully devised a way to distinguish the denominations on both sides of the coin - there are some fun effects from the way he placed his typographical elements.

Peter

Yes, they're very playful, the reverses. Reminds me slightly of the final Dutch pre-euro series, where some of the elements were sideways on to the portrait. I'd never seen that done before.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2009, 03:00:04 AM »
I would consider this series of plaster models the least innovative. Katinka Bruijn-Van Rood designed the 1973 and 1980 commemorative issues. This time, the Ministry wanted something different, though. She submitted two series. I am under the impression that she threw a large number of ideas at the Commission, hoping she'd score with one of them. This series would probably have won, if the users would have had a voice in the matter.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2009, 03:12:29 AM »
Professor Eric Claus may be one of the best Dutch medallists of his time. He submitted designs that I find strong, interesting, a pleasure to look at. This series would have had my vote if anyone had asked me. He didn't quite lose. Look at the 50 gulden 1982 ...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2009, 02:14:41 PM »
This last set looks good indeed - at least the sides with the face values. The Queen's portrait however ... well, it looks "too wide" to me. Interesting, by the way, that some of the design series already included the 5 gulden piece while others (earlier ones?) did not.

In my opinion, the designs that were actually minted later are the best, but I also like Jan Snoeck's designs. The only problem I have with the modern/stylized portrait is that he apparently used the name and title to "form" Beatrix's hair. Nice idea, but if the result is Ne-der-lan-den in four lines, hmm ...

Christian

Offline chrisild

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2009, 02:18:41 PM »
Here are three designs for Dutch euro circulation coins. Unfortunately I do not remember where I got them from, and the images and particularly the text bits are somewhat blurry. Frankly, I would not really want to have a map in my hair. ;)

Christian

Galapagos

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2009, 04:33:22 PM »
Claus's designs look strong candidates. Not keen on Snoeck's, yet you both seem to like him.

In my piece on designer Avril Vaughan, you'll note that she produced her Sierra Leone pieces at the Royal Dutch Mint. This shows that the RDM has global scope, so there are probably prototype designs to be found there that were done for other countries - if only we knew how to access them.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2011, 10:44:41 PM by coffeetime »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Dutch delights
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2009, 10:13:06 AM »
Not keen on Snoeck's, yet you both seem to like him.

I think that's why patterns are so appealing, I guess. They come in different styles and from different approaches, so people with different tastes will have different favourites. I'd love to be in a commission that decides on these designs. Not because I think my taste is superior, but because I would enjoy the discussion.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.