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Author Topic: Indo-Greek, Heliokles II Dikaios, AR Tetradrachm, Bop 1A, SNG ANS 1139-41.  (Read 220 times)

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Offline PeaceBD

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BAKTRIA, Indo-Greek Kingdom. Heliokles II Dikaios. Circa 90-75 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 9.61 g, 11h). Indian Weight Standard.
OBV: Diademed bust of king right, Greek legend around:
     BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔIKAIOY / HΛIOKΛEOYΣ
     Basileos Dikaiou Heliokleous ... (of King Heliocles, the just)
REV: Radiate Zeus standing slightly left, holding thunderbolt in right hand, spear in left,  monogram to lower left.
Kharoshthi legend around: maharajasa dhramikasa / heliyakreyasa
Bopearachchi 1A; SNG ANS 1139-41; HGC 12, 377. Extremely rare especially in this state of preservation.



Thanks
Bhushan
« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 08:27:29 AM by THCoins »

Offline THCoins

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Very beautifull specimen ! Great how you captured the flowlines on the surface.
In the portrait i notice the very high cheekbone and sunken cheek. Not as striking as in Zoilos II, but quite similar. I wonder if this could just have been considered a sign of royalty.

Offline Bob L.

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Wow, outstanding coin...just beautiful.

Offline PeaceBD

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Very beautifull specimen ! Great how you captured the flowlines on the surface.
In the portrait i notice the very high cheekbone and sunken cheek. Not as striking as in Zoilos II, but quite similar. I wonder if this could just have been considered a sign of royalty.
Thanks a lot! Your observation on the portrait is one of the things which attracted me to this specimen. It shows a high cheek bone and a strong jaw line. A lot of time this feature is subdued on worn specimens I have seen but it is still identifiable for this king. If it was considered a sign of royalty would be hard to say as there are other rulers between Heliokles II and Zoilos II which do not show these characters like Nikias, Apollodotus II & Hippostratos who had a more "chubby" look to their portraits.
Wow, outstanding coin...just beautiful.
Thanks a lot!

Bhushan

Offline THCoins

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Quote
If it was considered a sign of royalty would be hard to say as there are other rulers between Heliokles II and Zoilos II which do not show these

Which my present avatar picture, Apollodotus II, indeed nicely illustrates.

Anthony

Offline echizento

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Wow! that is a beautiful coin, congrats.

Offline Figleaf

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In the portrait i notice the very high cheekbone and sunken cheek. Not as striking as in Zoilos II, but quite similar. I wonder if this could just have been considered a sign of royalty.

In my collection of coins of Chach, it is clear that portraits are adapted to show the racial background of the ruler. Some are Asian, some European. It wouldn't be surprising if the Indo-Greeks had pulled a similar trick: showing their central Asian descent to an Indian population.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.