Author Topic: Qajar, Nasir al-Din Shah, 1310 AH (1893 AD), 2 Kran, Mint Tehran KM 909  (Read 219 times)

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Offline aws22

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Qajar, Nasir al-Din Shah, 1310 AH (1893 AD), 2 Kran, Mint Tehran KM 909 (1264-1314 AH)
Weight 8.28 gm
Diameter 28 mm
Metal Silver
Obverse: Crown above lion and sun within wreath, date “13 ۱۳ ” on left side of lion legs and “10 ۱۰ ” on right side, value “Two Karn دو قران “ below lion.
Reverse:  السلطان صاحبقران ناصرالدین شاه قاجار, Al-Sultan Sahibqiran Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar, within beaded circle and crowned wreath, Tehran at the bottom (not visible).
Nice coin, rare date.

Maythem
« Last Edit: June 15, 2017, 12:14:26 PM by aws22 »
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline THCoins

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There is some "blob" over the body of the lion. Looks almost if someone tried to solder something to the coin for use as jewelry ?

Offline aws22

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Thank you Anthony, it is a solder left over from removing a hook or support to the coin. Yes, this coin was used as jewelry.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline Figleaf

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Do you remember the discussion here? The principle is that solder has a much lower melting point than silver. This one looks like it can be repaired, either by yourself or by a jeweller.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline aws22

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Thank you Peter, I do remember that. I should be able to do it myself.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".

Offline THCoins

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On the other had, the use as a jewel may have preserved this coin upto today. In that respect the soldering is part of its history. I myself would have some reluctance to remove it.

Anthony

Offline aws22

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Thank you Anthony, I do agree with you. Most of my Persian coins which I have posted have holes or soldered with hooks, which indicates that they were part of women jewelry kept and preserved for many years. Families who inherited jewelry from their grandmothers do sell the silver coins thinking that they are of no value and keep gold items from themselves.

Maythem
Coin collecting has a curious name. It is also called the "Hobby of Kings".